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... Santiago de Compostela

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City map Santiago de Compostela

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    Santiago de Compostela – a brief overview

    Santiago de Compostela, the capital of the autonomous community of Galicia, has around 130 000 inhabitants, of whom some 30 000 are students. The city is best known as a place of pilgrimage. In fact, after Rome and Jerusalem, it is Christianity’s third most important pilgrimage site. Thousands of pilgrims flock each year to the cathedral containing the tomb of Saint James (Sant Iago) or drift through the picturesque narrow streets lined with the typical granite buildings of the region.

    However, even vacationers who do not come in search of inner peace consider Santiago de Compostela an attractive travel destination. For one thing, there’s the old town, as an ensemble listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most attractive anywhere in Europe, and for another, the surrounding region. It holds untold possibilities for active vacationers – from hiking trails along the Deza and Ulla rivers to golf courses with magnificent views of the Atlantic.

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    24 hours in Santiago de Compostela

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    After Rome and Jerusalem, Santiago de Compostela is Christianity’s third most important pilgrimage site, with places of spiritual retreat thousands of years old, such as monasteries and churches.

    The city has many delightful attractions for visitors, including some magnificent parks, as well as contemporary architecture, galleries of modern design and a creative restaurant scene that serves up classic Galician specialties with an international twist.

    09:00 a.m.: The day begins at Moure Hotel

    Rúa dos Loureiros 6
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/58 36 37
    Show on map

    This little boutique hotel is situated at the heart of the labyrinthine old town. Seen from the road, it looks just like all the other buildings on Rúa Loureiros thanks to the strict regulations governing monument conservation within the casco histórico. Surprises await visitors, however, in the inner courtyard and the rooms of this hotel with its minimalist, understated decor. The architect duo Elisabeth Ábalo and Gonzalo Alonso responsible for the hotel’s refurbishment in 2010 focused on clear lines and colors to create a calm aesthetic.

    Bed and breakfast per room starts at around 70 euros

    10:00 a.m.: Coffee break at the Pastelería Mercedes Mora

    Rúa do Vilar 50
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/56 57 24
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    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0900-2130
    Sat-Sun 1000-2130

    Set out from the hotel in the direction of Igrexa de San Francisco and continue across central Praza do Obradoiro square, where the cathedral is located. By the time you get to Rúa do Vilar 50, you have earned a short break. It may not be particularly far to walk, but making your way on foot through the mostly crowded Compostela Monumental, a kind of open-air shopping mall, can be pretty exhausting.

    So go on, dive into the sweet world of the Mercedes Mora traditional confectionery, where brightly colored, elaborately designed tortes share shelf space with cakes and confectionery. You can relax a while and sample the sweet treats on offer at one of the tables outside or at the modern counter indoors, but most of the goodies are sold to take home or eat as you go.

    11:00 a.m.: Fundación Eugenio Granell

    Praza do Toural, Pazo de Bendaña
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/57 21 24
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Fri 1100-1400,
    1600-2000
    Sat 1200-1400,
    1700-2000

    With your inner batteries deliciously replenished, walk just a few meters further to reach Pazo de Bendaña on Praza do Toural. This is where you will find Fundación Granell, which was founded by the Surrealist artist Eugenio Fernández Granell (1912-2001) in collaboration with the city of Santiago de Compostela. Most of the works exhibited here are Granell’s, which look very much like Picasso drawings colored in by Miró, but you can also admire Granell’s Surrealist collection here. A few hundred meters further along, on Rúa Cardenal Payá 9, Luisa Pita’s art gallery showcases the works of aspiring young artists of all disciplines.

    01:00 p.m.: A Horta do Obradoiro

    Rua das Hortas 16
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/57 21 24
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1330-1630,
    2100-2300
    Sun only open at lunchtime

    Head back toward the cathedral: The best route to take is via the Rúa do Francó gastro mile, where you can see what’s on offer later on in the evening. The A Horta do Obradoiro restaurant (Obradoiro’s garden) occupies a 16th-century building close by the cathedral. Inside and outside, everything looks like a garden party here: airy, green and down to earth. The menu lists both traditional Galician dishes and the seasonally inspired creations of the two chefs, Francisco Kike Piñeiro and Eloy Cancela. Their often unusual dishes conjured from everything the ocean has to offer are well worth a special recommendation. And after the meal? Off to the garden for a siesta!

    03:00 p.m.: Architecture in the afternoon

    Avenida Xoán XXIII
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Interested in discovering some modern architecture? Then leave the old town behind and head north on Igrexa de San Francisco in the afternoon. There, on Avenida de Xoán XXIII, you will find one of the most striking witnesses to the city’s new urban development concept: a glass roof balanced on pillars designed by Albert Viaplana and Helio Piñón. It serves as a shelter from sunshine and rain for pedestrians making their way from the central parking garage into the old town. Behind it, the towering glass facade of the Biblioteca Pública, the public library, mirrors the historical buildings.

    Now continue further north to Parque de Vista Alegra park, where the Escuela de Altos Estudios Musicales (school of advanced musical studies) designed by Antón García-Abril makes an impressive sight, standing on a rough, unpolished square of rock in the park. The walk takes you on to the northern university campus with its ensemble of buildings that is probably best described today as pragmatism cast in concrete: straight lines, utterly devoid of ornamentation.

    Set out from Avenida Xoán XXIII

    10:00 p.m.: La Industrial

    Avenida de Rosalía de Castro 24
    15701 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-881/97 39 17
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 1300-0030

    There are other nice places to spend an evening in the old town besides the gastro mile. One of them is, for example, the Industrial, which is located close to the city park. This tapas bar brings together Santiago’s students and resident Compostelanos. Owner Gonzalo Concheiro was originally an architect, and his bar pays homage to the workers’ culture of the 18th and 19th century: Industrial lamps and second-hand furniture dominate the decor, and wooden cable drums serve as tables. Everything on the menu here is served so that it can be shared with other guests at the table, be it mussel-filled wantons (dumplings) or frittered brie with blueberry sauce.

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    Top 10 sights Santiago de Compostela

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    Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide, Spain, Santiago de Compostela
    The Cidade da Cultura de Galicia, Galicia’s city of culture, was never completed, but even unfinished, the ensemble of buildings atop Monte Gaiás is nothing short of spectacular

    Praza do Obradoiro (Obradoiro Square)

    Praza do Obradoiro
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    The most important buildings in the pilgrim city are grouped around this magnificent square. The cathedral with the archbishop’s palace on Pazo de Xelmirez in the east, the seat of the city’s administration on Pazo de Raxoi in the west, the former pilgrim hospital, Hostal de Reis Católicos, on the northern side and the Colexio de San Xerome, seat of the University Rectorate, on the southern side. The arcades and the square are constantly alive with the daily comings and goings of street artists and traders, pilgrims and tourists.

    Catedral de Santiago (Cathedral)

    Plaza Obradoiro
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/569 327
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    Opening times:
    Daily 0700-2100

    No matter which of the many routes a pilgrim takes, the cathedral marks the end of the Way of St. James. Its construction was begun in 1075, and additions were made to the building over several centuries. The centerpiece of the cathedral is the statue of the Saint James the Apostle (Sant Iago) above the High Altar. Embracing the statue is the act that completes a pilgrim’s journey. Useful tip: Guided tours onto and over the roof of the cathedral (cubiertas de la catedral) are available on weekdays – the view is amazing provided you have a head for heights.

    Museo das Peregrinacións (Museum of Pilgrimages)

    Praza das Praterías 2
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/581 558
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Fri 930-2030
    Sat 1100-1900
    Sun and public holidays 1015-1445

    The history of both the cathedral’s construction and the city as a pilgrimage site is retraced through the seven rooms of the Museum of Pilgrimages. Visitors can learn more about the origins of St. James’ veneration from construction models, sculptures and original documents.

    Parque de Alameda (City Park)

    Rúa do Campiño da Ferradura
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    The city park, located in the southwestern part of the old town, is made up of three areas: the Alameda (poplar avenue), the Carballeira de Santa Susana (oak grove) and the Paseo da Ferradura (horseshoe promenade). The park is well worth a visit not just for its high recreational value, but also, at dusk, for the fantastic view of the cathedral and the old town to be had from the Paseo de Herradura.

    Mercado de Abastos (Abastos Market)

    Rúa das Ameas
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/583 438
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 0700-1500

    A trip to the market halls in the casco histórico, the old town, is definitely recommended: Fish, shellfish, fruit and vegetables are sold here, as well as  regional specialties, such as scallops and queixo tetilla, Galicia’s traditional semi-soft, cow’s-milk cheese. For a small consideration, the staff at Mariscomanía, the market bar, will prepare the produce you have just bought at the farmer’s market – you can’t get fresher than that.

    Rúa do Franco

    Rúa do Franco
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    The Rúa do Franco, the street of the “Franks,” as the pilgrims who crossed into Spain via the Pyrenees were once known, has probably been the part of Santiago every visitor since the Middle Ages has got to know. The vast majority of the old town’s restaurants and taverns have always been located in its arcades and entrerruás, as the extremely narrow streets are called, and neighboring streets, such as Rúa Nova and Rúa do Vilar. On many of the buildings, there are still symbols hewn into the stone, a scallop, say, a tree or five stars, indicating who owned them: the local council, San Martiño Pinario Monastery or the university.

    Museo do Pobo Galego (Museum of Galician People)

    Calle San Domingos de Bonaval s/n
    15703 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/583 620
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1030-1400 and 1600-1900
    Sun and public holidays 1100-1400

    The anthropological museum near the Porta do Camino pilgrim’s gate is housed in a wing of Santo Domingo de Bonaval Monastery. Its spiral staircase of three intertwined flights of stairs is an acknowledged masterpiece of Baroque architecture. The museum’s permanent exhibition sheds light on various aspects of Galician culture; exhibits include traditional costumes, musical instruments, Galician paintings and archeological finds.

    Cidade da Cultura de Galicia (Galicia’s City of Culture)

    Monte Gaiás s/n
    15707 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel: +34-881/997 565
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0800-2300 (April-September)
    Daily 0800-2000 (October-March)

    The City of Culture on Monte Gaiás was designed by New York architect Peter Eisenman and is a relic from the years when Spain was enjoying exceptional prosperity. Unfortunately, skyrocketing costs meant that the ensemble was never completed. Nevertheless, art exhibitions and events are held at the spectacular Gaiás Centre Museum, and the Galician National Archive and National Library are also in operation.

    Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea, CGAC (Galician Center for Contemporary Art)

    Rúa Valle Inclán 2
    15703 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/546 619
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 1100-2000

    This exhibition space is housed in a rectangular granite building next door to San Domingo de Bonaval Monastery. Its changing exhibitions spotlight the work of contemporary artists from all over the world. From the roof terrace, you have a magnificent view of the old town.

     

    Pazo de Santa Cruz de Rivadulla (Santa Cruz de Rivadulla Park)

    Lugar de Ortigueira
    15880 Vedra
    Spain
    Tel. +34-981/512 011
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0930-1300 and 1500-1830
    (or until sunset)
    Sat 1100-1300 and
    1500 -1830
    (or until sunset)
    Sun and public holidays 1500-1830
    (or until sunset)

    This fantastic park in the Ulla Valley is less than 20 kilometers outside of Santiago on the Ourense road. It is famous chiefly for the more than 200 varieties of camellia that grow there, but the manor house, the avenue lined with olive trees, the giant magnolias and the large liriodendrons (tulip trees) are all well worth seeing.

    Good to know

    Country Information

    Country overview

    Spain is one of the most popular holiday destinations in Europe. Endless beaches, brilliant sunshine and azure waters draw beach lovers to the Mediterranean coast, and the Balearic and Canary Islands. But visitors also flock to see the historical architecture of cities, such as Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Leon, Seville and Segovia.

    If you want to experience the real Spain, don’t go to bed too early. In these parts, people stroll the city squares and dine out late into the night.

    Geography

    Spain accounts for roughly four-fifths of the Iberian Peninsula, with Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar occupying the remainder. In the northeast, the Pyrenees form a natural frontier to France. The state territory also encompasses the Balearic Islands (Mallorca, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera) located southeast of Barcelona, in the Mediterranean, and the Canary Islands off the west coast of Africa. Ceuta, Chafarinas, Melilla and Ladu are tiny Spanish enclaves in North Africa, relics of the former Spanish Empire.

    Spain is a mountainous country. The Pyrenees extend for 400 kilometers from the Basque Country in the northwest to the Mediterranean. Some peaks rise more than 3000 meters above sea level; the highest elevation here is the Pico de Aneto at 3404 meters above sea level. The country’s interior consists of a vast plateau, the Meseta, which is intersected by a number of mountain ranges.

    In the north and northwest, the Meseta is bordered by the Cantabrian Mountains and the Iberian Mountains, and in the South by the Sierra Morena, beyond which lies the Guadalquivir Valley. Galicia’s mountainous landscape runs along the jagged Atlantic coast. The extreme south is also mountainous; the Sierra Nevada southeast of Granada belongs to the Betic Cordilleras, which run parallel to the Mediterranean and include the highest mountain on the Spanish mainland, the Mulhacén (3481 meters above sea level). The highest elevation on Spanish territory is the Pico del Teide (3718 meters above sea level) on Tenerife.

    Spain has just under 5000 kilometers of coastline. The Mediterranean coast extends from the French border to the Rock of Gibraltar. The Strait of Gibraltar connects the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and divides Spain from North Africa.

    General Information

    Key facts

    Population: 46.43 million (2016)

    Population Density (per sq km): 92

    Capital: Madrid.
    Population: 3.16 million (2016)

    Language

    The official language is Spanish (Castellano, Castilian). Catalan, Galician and Basque are spoken regionally; in tourist regions, English and German are commonly spoken foreign languages.

    Electricity

    220 V, 50 Hz (sometimes 110/125 V in older buildings in smaller places)

    Currency

    1 euro = 100 cents
    Currency sign/abbreviation: €, EUR (ISO code). Banknotes are available in the values 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 euros, coins, in the nominal values 1 and 2 euros, as well as 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents.

    Public holidays

    The public holidays for the period January 2017 through December 2018 are listed below.

    Please note

    a) Several regional public holidays also exist.
    b) It is usual for public holidays which fall on a Sunday to be substituted by work-free days on subsequent weekdays.

    * not in all parts of the country

    2017

    Año Nuevo (New Year’s): January 1, 2017
    Epifanía (Epiphany): January 6, 2017
    Día de San José (St. Joseph’s Day): March 19, 2017*
    Jueves Santo (Maundy Thursday): April 13, 2017*
    Viernes Santo (Good Friday): April 14, 2017
    Domingo de Resurrección (Easter Sunday): April 17, 2017
    Día del Trabajo (Labor Day): May 1, 2017
    Asunción de la Virgen (Assumption Day): August 15, 2017
    Fiesta Nacional de España (Spanish National Day): October 12, 2017
    Fiesta de Todos los Santos (All Saints’ Day): November 1, 2017
    Día de la Constitución (Constitution Day): December 6, 2017
    La Inmaculada (Feast of the Immaculate Conception): December 8, 2017
    Navidad (Christmas): December 25, 2017

    2018

    Año Nuevo (New Year’s): January 1, 2018
    Epifanía (Epiphany): January 6, 2018
    Día de San José (St. Joseph’s Day): March 19, 2018*
    Jueves Santo (Maundy Thursday): March 29, 2018*
    Viernes Santo (Good Friday): March 30, 2018
    Domingo de Resurrección (Easter Sunday): April 1, 2018
    Día del Trabajo (Labor Day): May 1, 2018
    Asunción de la Virgen (Assumption Day): August 15, 2018
    Fiesta Nacional de España (Spanish National Day): October 12, 2017
    Fiesta de Todos los Santos (All Saints’ Day): November 1, 2018
    Día de la Constitución (Constitution Day): December 6, 2018
    La Inmaculada (Feast of the Immaculate Conception): December 8, 2018
    Navidad (Christmas): December 25, 2018

    Information subject to error.

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    Nightlife in Santiago de Compostela

    ListMap

    Santiago is a pilgrim and university city, as the wide range of available entertainment reveals. Many of the nightlife spots frequented by a young and international public are located in the casco histórico, the old town, roughly on and around Rúa San Paio de Antealtares, Rúa do Vilar, Rúa Nova and Avenida Rodrigo de Padrón.

    The hottest spots in the new town, or Ensanche, are on Carreira do Conde, Rúa Montero Ríos and further south, around Praza Roxa. Like everywhere else in Spain, people eat late here, so hardly anyone heads out to clubs and discos much before midnight.

    Borriquita de Belem

    Rúa de San Paio de Antealtares 22
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    This live club in the old town is one of the city’s established addresses for jazz, blues and cocktails. Bands perform almost daily on its small stage, which also hosts jam sessions.

    Disco La Ruta

    Rúa Pérez Costanti
    15702 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    When it’s late in the evening, a mostly student audience gets together at this after-hours club, where the DJs also give rumba and salsa a spin on the turntable.

    O París bar

    Rúa dos Bautizados 11
    15702 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    This bar would not be particularly remarkable in itself, were it not the starting point for an evening drinking ritual in the old town: Galicia’s own “Paris-Dakar rally”, a pub crawl that covers the almost 200 meters from this tavern to the Dakar bar (Rúa do Franco 13). There are more than 20 bars along the way, and rally participants are expected to stop at each one and – you guessed it – down a glass there.

    Auditorio der Galicia

    Avenida do Burgo das Nacións
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    In 2000, Santiago was a European Capital of Culture, a title people are still proud of today. Today, innovative and first-rate programs are staged at Teatro Principal (Rúa Nova 21), Galerie Zona C (Rúa de San Domingos de Bonaval 1) and in this concert hall, which has hosted performances by various orchestras, including the Real Filharmonía de Galicia.

    Galopín Cantina

    Rúa de Fernando III o Santo 1
    15701 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    The designer of this wine bar’s interior was lavish with his colors and entertaining decorative ideas. So guests can now sit here and enjoy the friendly ambience over a glass of Spanish wine or craft beer and tuck into salads, tapas and other tidbits from the bar’s creative kitchen.

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Santiago de Compostela

    ListMap

    Galicia’s cuisine is rich in fish and seafood specialties, and the best known are trout dishes and delicacies fresh from the Atlantic, including scallops, goose barnacles, blue mussels, oysters, tuna and squid. The wines served with the food are mostly Spanish, for example from La Rioja.

    Santiago de Compostela has plenty of small restaurants on and around Rúa Franco in the old town, but be warned, they capitalize on their central location. Dining is a more reasonable affair in the area around the market hall and Praza de Cervantes.

    Casa Marcelo

    Rúa Hortas 1
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Price level: superior

    Santiago de Compostela has a Michelin-starred restaurant, too, namely this unpretentious gastro bar near Praza do Obradoirom, where diners can look on as the chefs prepare Galician-Japanese-Peruvian fusion food in the open kitchen.

    Taberna Abastos 2.0

    Rúa das Ameas, 13 -18
    15703 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Price level: moderate

    The Taberna also calls itself the cocina del mercado (market kitchen) – and housed in pepped-up former market stalls, that is exactly what it is. The chefs buy in provisions from the market next door and serve an exquisitely fresh menu composed of myriad dainties. The attractive concept also works well in the partner restaurant Galpón (Ameas 4) and Abastos bar (Rúa da Conga 8).

    Casa de Xantar Bierzo Enxebre

    La Troya 10
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Price level: moderate

    El Bierzo is a wine region in the north of Léon province, roughly 200 kilometers east of Santiago de Compostela. This rustic restaurant near the cathedral serves mostly regional specialties. The fish dishes are particularly to be recommended, and the pulpo à feira, octopus, is one of the most popular meals here.

    Mariscomania

    Plaza de Abastos – Bajos 80-85
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Price level: budget

    An original restaurant concept is practiced at market stalls 80 to 85 of the Abastos market: Guests buy their own ingredients from the surrounding stalls and pay a small fee to have them prepared on the spot. For those with neither the inclination nor the time to do that, there’s also a daily menu to choose from, of course.

    Chocolateria y Bar Metate

    Rua Preguntoiro 12
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
    Show on map

    Price level: budget

    The Metate is a café by day and a popular bar by night. Housed in a former chocolate factory, it also serves excellent chocolate beverages and truffles.

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    Calendar of events

    Cabalgata dos Reis Magos (Three Kings Parade)

    5 January 2018

    Where: the entire city center

    In Spain, it’s not Santa Claus who brings the Christmas presents, but Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar, the three kings, or wise men. In the night from January 5 to 6, believers dressed as the three kings are welcomed at the train station with gun salutes that mark the start of the parade through the entire city. January 6, Epiphany, is a public holiday in Spain.

    Carnaval (carnival)

    13 – 14 February 2018

    Where: the entire city center

    Another tradition celebration takes place in Galicia before Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. On Shrove Tuesday, people dress up and join the carnival procession with its large, colorful floats. Another procession takes place on Ash Wednesday, and it ends with the burning of the meco, the figure that symbolizes the carnival.

    Semana Santa (Holy Week)

    31 March – 16 April 2017

    Where: cathedral and the entire city center

    Compostela’s Holy Week celebrations begin the Friday before Palm Sunday with the Procession de los Dolores, Our Lady of Sorrows procession. It is organized by the fraternities (cofradías), which are also responsible for all of the other parades. The penitents, nazarenos, parade day and night through the old town. These processions, concerts of sacred music, and naturally also masses, are the main features of these enthusiastically celebrated feast days.

    Ascensión (Ascension Day)

    24 – 28 May 2017

    Where: cathedral and the entire city center

    Good weather tends to be the norm around Ascension Day, which makes the festivities even more attractive: In addition to church events, such as masses, concerts and processions, secular amusements are also available, including a food market in the Carballeira de Santa Susana in the city park.

    Las Fiestas del Apóstol (Feast of Saint James)

    15 – 31 July 2017

    Where: cathedral and the entire city center

    The Fiestas del Apóstol celebrations in the second half of July, a mix of folk, church and city festival, are the high point of the annual event calendar. On the evening of July 24, a spectacular fireworks display is staged on Praza do Obradoiro to welcome in July 25, which is the Día de Santiago, Saint James’ Day, and therefore the highest of the city’s religious feast days. On the evening of July 31, the festival ends with an audiovisual spectacle and a magnificent fireworks display on the Campus Sur.

    Festival Cineuropa

    8 – 27 November 2017
    Website

    Where: Teatro Principal, NUMAX cinema and other venues

    This fall festival has been attracting movie buffs since 1987. It shows the award-winning films of the international film festivals of Cannes, Berlin and Venice, as well as independent productions. The festival, which also features a newcomer program and a series for documentaries and restored revivals, is expressly not a competition.

    Santiago (é)Tapas

    17 November 17 – 4 December 2017
    Website

    Where: the entire city center

    Bars and wine taverns all over town participate in this food pilgrimage, in which guests sample attractively priced tapas and name a favorite as their personal winner. Having sampled the tapas (English: appetizers) along the etapas (English: stages), you can record the event with a stamp is your tapasporte – just like the pilgrims have their completed stages along the Way of St. James stamped in their pilgrim’s passport.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Santiago de Compostela

    ListMap

    Santiago de Compostela is the capital of Galicia, but first and foremost, it’s a place of pilgrimage. As such, it has a long tradition of hospitality. Today, visitors can choose from roughly 120 hotels and guesthouses in the city, many of them located in the casco histórico, the medieval old town, where the cathedral and the city’s main tourist attractions are all within a fairly small radius. But even in the Ensanche, the new town area of the city to the south, accommodation beckons – as does a lively nightlife scene.

    The entire city center is not very big, however, so that everything is within easy walking distance from both parts of town. If you are planning to come in the second half of July, definitely book ahead because the city really fills up during the Fiestas del Apóstol, the Feast of Saint James.

    Parador de Santiago/Hostal Reis Católicos

    Praza do Obradoiro 1
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    Category: expensive

    Once the Catholic Monarchs’ pilgrim’s hospital, this imposing building next door to the cathedral today houses a luxury hotel. Nowhere in Santiago are you likely to find a finer place to stay than this 15th century building with its vaulted ceilings, stone arches and wall tapestries.

    San Francisco Hotel Monumento

    Campillo de San Francisco 3
    15705 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    Category: expensive

    This luxury hotel occupies an 18th-century building just 150 meters from the cathedral that was originally a Franciscan monastery. From the rooms and the hotel’s private indoor swimming pool, guests can enjoy a splendid view of Monte Pedroso and the monastery gardens. The hotel has several function rooms.

    Hospedería San Martín Pinario

    Plaza de la Inmaculada 3
    15704 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    Category: moderate

    This centrally located hotel places the emphasis on practicality. The interior concept is a perfect fit for this monastery building dating from the 16th century, with its vaulted ceilings and monastery gardens. A good choice for tourists and business travelers, who go for comfortable, but unpretentious accommodation.

    Nest Style Santiago

    Rua Doutor Teixeiro 15
    15701 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    Category: moderate

    This modern hotel is situated close to Plaza de Galicia, where the new town begins. Fresh colors and clear lines dominate; the furnishings and decor are modern, the service is friendly, and the prices are reasonable.

    Hostal Mapula P. R.

    Entremurallas 10-3
    15702 Santiago de Compostela
    Spain
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    Category: budget

    This ten-room guesthouse occupies a central location close to Plaza de Galicia. A granite building dating from the 1950s, it has been given a complete makeover and now offers appealing rooms with wooden floors and an ensuite bathroom at fair prices. The hotel also has a small bar.

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Saturday, 19.08.2017 19:00 UTC

    partly cloudy

    temperature


    20°C


    wind direction

    north

    wind speed

    10.625 mph

    7 days forecast

    Sunday

    20.08.2017

    31°C / 13°C

    Monday

    21.08.2017

    36°C / 13°C

    Tuesday

    22.08.2017

    30°C / 15°C

    Wednesday

    23.08.2017

    31°C / 14°C

    Thursday

    24.08.2017

    25°C / 15°C

    Friday

    25.08.2017

    23°C / 15°C

    Saturday

    26.08.2017

    22°C / 11°C

    Climate & best time to visit Spain

    The Spanish climate varies from region to region, spanning moderate in the north to Mediterranean in the south, and even subtropical on the Canary Islands.

    The best times to visit Spain are generally in the spring and the fall, when temperatures are agreeable. In most parts of the country, it is very hot at the height of summer, but sea breezes on the coast keep it bearable; the interior is best avoided in July and August. The climate on the Atlantic coast and in all of Galicia is pleasant even in summer. In winter, you can enjoy winter sports in the Pyrenean Mountains or agreeably warm days on the south and southeast coast, as well as on the Canary Islands.

    Best time to visit Galicia

    Galicia is at its loveliest in the pleasantly mild summer months. Although rain is a possibility all year round, bad weather doesn’t normally last long, and the typical granite buildings of the region are soon reflect the rays of the sun again. The main Catholic feast days, which are also celebrated in Santiago de Compostela, fall in the summer months, such as Ascension Day in the early summer and the Feast of Saint James in the second half of July.

    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone
    Country code: +34

    Mobile telephony and Internet
    Since June 2017, EU citizens traveling within the EU, and also in Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein have been able to use their cell phones and surf the Net without incurring any extra charges: In other words, customers pay the same price for phone calls, text messages and data volume as they do at home. Restrictions do apply to the constant use of SIM cards abroad, however, and caps may be set on data packages. For full details, contact your mobile telephony provider in your country. Travelers using a SIM card from a non-EU state do not benefit from the new arrangement.

    Free Internet access via Wi-Fi is possible in many busy tourist spots. When using public Wi-Fi networks, it is a wise precaution to ensure encryption of all passwords, credit card details and banking TANs entered. Use of a VPN app or security software to check the safety of a hotspot is recommended.

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Zagreb

    Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

    Key Areas

    In the casco histórico, the medieval old town (including Rúa do Franco, Rúa do Villar, Rúa Calderería, Rúa Nova), the place to shop is at the Compostela Monumental, a kind of open-air shopping mall: Here, you will find several specialist stores within a very small radius whose combined offerings correspond to those of a giant shopping mall – except that these are in historical surroundings. Books and jewelry, clothes and accessories, devotionals, souvenirs and delicatessen can all be purchased here. Leave the old town via Plaza de Galicia and you come to the new town, or Ensanche. The stores on the main streets, Xeneral Pardiñas, Doutor Teixeiro and República de El Salvador, specialize mostly in Spanish and international fashion labels, shoes and accessories.

    Markets

    The most famous market in Santiago de Compostela is the Mercado de Abastos in the old town (Rua Ameás, mercadodeabastosdesantiago.com, open Mon-Sat, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Here, you can buy fish, seafood, fruit and vegetables as well as regional specialties, such as queixo tetilla, Galicia’s semi-soft, cow’s-milk cheese, and scallops. On Rua Nova, you will find a row of stalls selling arts and crafts.

    Shopping centres

    The Centro Comercial Compostela (Rúa do Restollal 50, elcorteingles.es) has branches of El Corte Inglés and Hipericor. The new shopping center Centro Comercial As Cancelas (Avenida Do Camiño Francés 3, ascancelas.es) in the north of the city is particularly upmarket. Besides fashion and shoe stores, you will also find a large supermarket here, along with cafés, restaurants and a movie theater.

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    It is polite in Spain to shake hands in greeting. The usual courtesies should be observed. If you are invited to someone’s home, your host will appreciate a small gift. Flowers are given only on special occasions.

    Clothing

    Casual dress is appropriate almost everywhere, although some hotels and restaurants require men to wear a jacket and tie; evening dress is only required for particularly formal occasions. Swimwear belongs without exception on the beach.

    Smoking

    A smoking ban applies in all public institutions, on public transportation, in telephone booths and in rooms containing ATMs, as well as in children’s playgrounds and schoolyards. The smoking ban also applies to all bars, cafés and restaurants. Smoking areas inside bars and restaurants are no longer permitted.

    Tipping

    Tips are generally included in hotel and restaurant bills. It is nevertheless usual to leave a small tip for the service staff. Porters receive a small sum per item of luggage. The usual amount tipped in restaurants is between 10 and 15 percent. When the waiter brings your change, you leave some as the tip. It is considered extremely rude, however, to leave two- or five-cent pieces. When tipping your taxi driver, simply round up the fare.

    Good to know

    Health

    Emergency telephone number: 112

    Lyme disease, TBE (tick-borne encephalitis) and leishmaniosis are all diseases which are passed on by ticks and mosquitoes and also occur in Spain. Clothing that covers the skin and insect repellents provide protection.

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis B occur all over Spain. A hepatitis A vaccination is generally recommended. Visitors planning an extended stay and close contact with the local population, and generally with children and young people, should also have a hepatitis B vaccination.

    Measles and whooping cough occur in Spain. Before traveling to Spain, visitors should definitely check whether their vaccinations are up to date and if necessary, get a booster shot.

    Epidemic outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis occur in Spain. Visitors should seek protection by getting a vaccination and avoiding large crowds. Children and young people, in particular, should be vaccinated. According to the latest recommendations, the vaccination applies as required travel vaccination for extended stays for certain groups of people (teenagers, school and university students). Visitors should consult their physician regarding the need for vaccination in the light of recommendations in the country of destination.

    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

    IATA Travel CentreIATA Travel Centre