Angola
Login

Unable to login to the Travel Guide. Please go to our homepage to login.

Homepage
Glasgow, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide
Sort by category
  • Good to know
  • Discover
  • Enjoy
  • Offers

City map

Quick view

Gardner Street, Glasgow, Schottland, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide

Top 10 sights

Glasgow, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide

United Kingdom
General knowledge

UK, England Travel Guide, Lufthansa

Airport Information

Flughafen, Airport, kontinental, Flotte, Lufthansa, Stadtführer

The great journey
Discovering the Highlands

Aberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide

Nightlife

Restaurants

Calendar of events

Hotels

We recommend, you book at

Weather & best time to visit

11°
Monday, 21.05.2018
04:00 UTC

Phone calls & Internet

Shopping in Glasgow

Find rental car

Travel etiquette
How to fit in

Health

Visa & Immigration

Good to know

City map Glasgow

Points of interest: Your selected categories
    Show all
    Good to know

    Glasgow – a brief overview

    Edinburgh might get all the plaudits, but Glasgow has a well-deserved reputation as one of the UK’s most vibrant cities. Steeped in history thanks to its shipbuilding past, this is a place where culture fiends will feel instantly at home.

    Whether it’s a visit to the striking Riverside Museum, a look up at Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s masterful Glasgow School of Art or a gig at any one of the city’s ace music venues, visitors will be left dazzled by everything that’s on offer. And with an ever-growing food scene, there are plenty of opportunities to kick back and reflect on your trip.

    Flight and accommodation

    Offers
    Discover

    Top 10 sights in Glasgow

    ListMap
    Glasgow, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Travel Guide

    Riverside Museum

    100 Pointhouse Place
    G3 8RS Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 287 2720
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Thu, Sat 1000-1700
    Fri, Sun 1100-1700

    Housed in a futuristic, angular building on Glasgow’s waterfront, the Riverside Museum is a delight for adults and kids alike. Delving into the city’s history of shipbuilding and industry, the museum offers a great take on the fast-paced changes which affected Glasgow during the 20th century.

    Burrell Collection

    Pollok Country Park, 2060 Pollokshaws Road
    G43 1AT Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 287 2550
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Thu, Sat 1000-1700
    Fri, Sun 1100-1700

    Just outside of the city centre, the Burrell Collection plays home to one of Scotland’s finest selections of art. Built up by industrialist Sir William Burrell, the collection was handed to the city in 1944. Everything from Islamic art to modern, abstract works are on show.

    Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

    Argyle Street
    G3 8AG Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 276 9599
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Thu, Sat 1000-1700
    Fri, Sun 1100-1700

    Designed by the renowned Charles Rennie Mackintosh, this is the best place to see the architect and artist’s work after a fire ripped through his other Glasgow masterpiece, the Glasgow School of Art. A great example of CRM’s ‘Glasgow Style’.

    The Mackintosh House

    82 Hillhead Street
    G12 8QQ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 330 4221
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1100-1600

    The home of Mackintosh and his wife during the early 20th century is another must-see. Original fixtures and fittings and CRM’s own art are on display, in a carefully curated recreation of the original house.

    Scottish Football Museum

    Hampden Park
    G42 9BA Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +4141 616 6139
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1100-1700

    Take a trip out to Hampden Park, the home of Scottish football and a museum detailing the history of the game north of the border. See classic kits, trophies and learn how the game became the be all and end all in this football-mad city.

    Hunterian Museum

    Gilbert Scott Building, University Of Glasgow, University Avenue
    G12 8QQ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 330 4221
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1100-1600

    Another outpost of Glasgow’s booming museum scene. The Hunterian Museum dates back to 1807, its collection focusing on surgery and medicine throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Implements used by Joseph Lister and James Watt form just part of a fascinating collection.

    Hunterian Art Gallery

    Gilbert Scott Building, University Of Glasgow, University Avenue
    G12 8QQ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 330 4221
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1100-1600

    As well as the science-focused Hunterian Museum, the art gallery of the same name is well worth your time. It has the largest permanent display of Whistler paintings in the world, as well as stunning works by the Scottish Colourists.

    Scotland Street School Museum

    225 Scotland Street
    G5 8QB Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 287 0500
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Thu, Sat 1000-1700
    Fri, Sun 1100-1700

    Another Mackintosh-designed building, housed in a school constructed at the start of the 20th century. Reconstructed classrooms shows visitors how education changed from Victorian times through to the 1960s.

    Glasgow Cathedral

    Castle Street
    G4 0QZ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 552 8198
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 0930-1730 (Apr-Sep)
    Sun 1300-1700 (Apr-Sep)
    Mon-Sat 0930-1630 (Oct-Mar)
    Sun 1300-1630 (Oct-Mar)

    A dark, brooding building, Glasgow Cathedral, also known as St Mungo’s, is one of the finest churches in Scotland. Dating back to the 12th century, its interior is full of unique artefacts, including a beautiful rood screen.

    Botanic Gardens

    730 Great Western Road
    G12 0UE Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 141 276 1614
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Grounds:
    Daily 0700-dusk
    Glasshouses:
    Daily 1000-1800 (summer)
    Daily 1000-1615 (winter)

    These sensational gardens rival London’s Kew Gardens in terms of the breadth of plants and flowers on show. If the weather is good, stroll the well-tended gardens. If not, pop into the greenhouses for a taste of more tropical climes.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Country information

    Country overview

    Few places cram in as much scenery, history and culture as the United Kingdom. England’s southwest is dominated by a rugged shoreline and swathes of open national parkland, while its sprawling and vibrant capital London dominates the southeast. Hillwalkers can take some serious hikes in the Scottish Highlands or England’s Lake District. True British wilderness remains – stark, sometimes stunning and often inaccessible, particularly in the far North of Scotland.

    Historic Edinburgh is a fascinating city to explore, while Glasgow explodes with nightlife options. Visitors to Wales can meander from the urban highlights of Cardiff to Snowdon’s jagged peaks in the north. Across the water, Belfast is reviving as a tourist destination, and Northern Ireland’s countryside is green and rolling.

    Geography

    The British landscape can be divided roughly into two kinds of terrain – highland and lowland. The highland area comprises the mountainous regions of Scotland, Northern Ireland, northern England and North Wales.

    The English Lake District in the northwest contains lakes and fells. The lowland area is broken up by sandstone and limestone hills, long valleys and basins such as the Wash on the east coast. In the southeast, the North and South Downs culminate in the White Cliffs of Dover.

    The coastline includes fjord-like inlets in the northwest of Scotland, spectacular cliffs and wild sandy beaches on the east coast and, further south, beaches of rock, shale and sand sometimes backed by dunes, and large areas of fenland in East Anglia.

    Note: The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland consists of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    Although they form one administrative unit (with regional exceptions), they have had separate cultures, languages and political histories.

    The United Kingdom section consists of a general introduction (covering the aspects that the four countries have in common) and sections devoted to the four constituent countries. The Channel Islands (Alderney, Guernsey, Jersey, Sark and Herm) and the Isle of Man are dependencies of the British Crown. These are included here for convenience of reference.

    More detailed geographical descriptions of the various countries may be found under the respective travel guides.

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Population: 64, 6 millions (2017)

    Population Density (per sq km): 261

    Capital: London.

    Language

    English. Welsh is spoken in parts of Wales, and Gaelic in parts of Scotland. The many ethnic minorities within the UK also speak their own languages (eg Cantonese, Greek, Hindi, Mandarin, Turkish, Urdu, etc).

    Currency

    Pound (GBP; symbol £) = 100 pence. Notes are in denominations of £50, 20, 10 and 5. Additional bank notes issued by Scottish banks (including £1 notes) are accepted in all parts of the UK, although some smaller shops outside Scotland may prefer English banknotes. Coins are in denominations of £2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 pence.

    Electricity

    230 volts AC, 50Hz. Square three-pin plugs are standard.

    Public holidays

    Below are Public Holidays for the January 2018 – December 2019 period.

    Note: Holidays falling on the weekend are observed the following Monday.

    2018

    New Year’s Day: 1 January 2018
    Good Friday: 30 March 2018
    May Day: 7 May 2018
    Spring Bank Holiday: 28 May 2018
    Christmas Day: 25 December 2018
    Boxing Day: 26 December 2018

    2019

    New Year’s Day: 1 January 2019
    Good Friday: 19 April 2019
    May Day: 6 May 2019
    Spring Bank Holiday: 27 May 2019
    Christmas Day: 25 December 2019
    Boxing Day: 26 December 2019

    All information subject to change.

    Flight and accommodation

    Discover

    Scotland – wild at heart

    Aberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, TravelguideAberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, TravelguideAberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, TravelguideAberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, TravelguideAberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, TravelguideAberdeen, Schottland, Die große Reise, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide
    The great journey: the island's northeast

    The highland escapades in the lastest James Bond movie Skyfall may have boosted Scotland’s popularity, but the country has long been a dream destination thanks to its natural landscapes, time-honored golf courses and smoky scotch. We start our trip in Aberdeen and travel around the northwest, encountering loads of fish, sled dog mushers, ancient settlements built on the water and rangers who make money off of 007.

    Lufthansa tip

    Lufthansa offers three daily services to Aberdeen and two daily services to Edinburgh from Frankfurt, as well as one flight daily to Glasgow from Dusseldorf. Germanwings serves Edinburgh six times weekly from Cologne lufthansa.com. Use the mileage calculator in the Miles & More app now and find out how many award and status miles have been credited to you for your flight. Download now on miles-and-more.com/app.

    Day 1 – 
Aberdeen to Meldrum: Master craftmanship

    Margot Brodie sits in a small garret room at the Alex Scott & Co. kilt factory amid photos of her collie dog, lengths of cloth, an array of bobbins and her thimble. Over in the corner, there’s a sewing machine. Outside the window, helicopters hover like seagulls above the granite-gray port as they carry their regular deliveries of workers to the oil rigs out in the North Sea.

    The sprightly senior is just back from lunch, which she takes punctually at eleven o’clock every morning. At 75, she is not only Aberdeen’s oldest kiltmaker, but also one of the best in the country. It takes her roughly 13 hours to complete a traditional Scottish kilt; a complete set can cost anything up to 1400 pounds. She began her five-year apprenticeship in 1954, learning her craft from an army kiltmaker. Today she is still passing on what she learned.

    “Ay, ay, it’s an industry with a secure future,” she says with a mischievous grin, “I’m not planning on retiring.” Her reputation extends far beyond the city’s limits. “People from all over the kingdom order my kilts,” she tells us with visible satisfaction, “I never get bored, I really enjoy the work.”

    As if to prove her point, she takes out her measuring tape, which is 60 inches long, roughly a meter and a half. “Once someone came to me for a kilt. He was such a fatty, I had to use two tapes to measure all the way round his middle!” she laughs. She just has one regret, namely not having emigrated to Australia 40 years ago! She does fly out there regularly on winter vacation, though.

    Day 2 – Meldrum to Craigellachnie: An educational experience

    “130 yards ist not bad for your first day,” says Neil Marr, 47, my golf instructor. In front of him, a laptop displays my tee-off performance data, and later Marr analyzes on video every error in my posture – and there are quite a few. Scotland is considered

    to be the cradle of the time-honored game, and Meldrum House Club, one of Scotland’s most exclusive golfing establishments, honors its traditions to the letter. The course is over 7000 yards long (roughly 6400 m), and club membership is limited to 400 to minimize waiting times. A stone’s throw from the first tee, there’s a stately old manor house that’s been converted into a luxury hotel.

    Head coach Marr also trains the Scottish national youth team, but today he has me to contend with. A qualified sports psychologist, he keeps his true thoughts about my golfing potential to himself. “The main thing a good golfer needs in additionto mental strength, technique, physical fitness and a good diet,” says Marr, “is patience.” Wanting to do too much too soon often ends in failure. “I play less but I still improve my game,” he says,a look of surprise momentarily crossing his face. Marr seems a paragon of composure, and looks ten years younger than he is. We trundle across the extensive course in the cart, enjoying the view of endless green hills. The sun is out, the birds are singing. We would be happy to stay for another couple of days but it’s time to move on.

    We plan to end the day at tiny Knockdhu Distillery, which was founded in 1894 and is hidden away in Knock, on the fringes of the Whisky Trail, a concentration of famous distilleries inthe northeast of the country. The air here is fragrant with the smell of malt.

    Master distiller Gordon Bruce, 49, takes us straight to the large wooden washbacks and copper stills. “We are very traditional in the way we produce our whisky, and we haven’t really changed our method in the past hundred years,” he says. “The fact that it’s not mass produced is what makes our scotch so special.” To prove his point, he holds up a calculator with huge buttons and mischievously says: “May I show you our latest computer?”

    The ground outside is peaty, ideal for growing barley, and fresh, clear water bubbles from several springs. These are ideal prerequisites for an excellent scotch. Next door, the different “vintages” are maturing under the roof of a large barn in some 1200 oak barrels brought over especially from Spain or the United States. “They were originally used to store sherry or bourbon,” Bruce explains, tenderly running his fingers over one of them, “the flavor rubs off.” The warehouse is his great treasure, and as he man strides between the long rows of barrels in the gloom, his face suddenly takes on a blissful expression. “I love my work because it’s not something you can plan. Conditions change constantly and that constantly creates new challenges,” he explains. In his free time, Bruce likes to travel occasionally, “but only to cold places.” Otherwise he spends his time experimenting with whisky, blending different single malts – as you can see, for him the job really is a “vocation.” Also, he lives right across from the distillery, his workplace always within sight and reach. His eldest daughter is a master distiller at Chivas and one of very few women in the profession His other two children aren’t quite there yet. “But I’m working on it,” says Bruce with a wicked grin. Sláinte!

    Day 3 – 
Craigellachnie via Cairngorms to Glencoe: 40 best friends

    “One dog is enough to take you for a walk,” says Nici Nardini, 36. Sled dog Pandora strains so hard on her leash you know immediately what she means. And listening to the barks and feral howls of the remaining 39 huskies outside their wooden kennels, you quickly realize why the Stewarts have no neighbors. Their cottage is in a clearing in the middle of nowhere, and their only regular visitor is a stork. Alan and Fiona Stewart are in the dog sled business, and Nardini helps them out of love for the animals. Asa dog handler, she travels all over the world. The Stewarts’ son, John, earns his living as a diver on an oil platform, but he’s alsoa professional “musher” (a person who drives a dog sled team) and competes in races. That’s why he spent the last three winters in Canada. He even survived Alaska’s Iditarod, the world’s most grueling dog sled race. “You must have the animals under control at minus 50 degrees because a tumble can be fatal,” says mother Fiona, 51, who herself raced for seven years.

    In a race, a team of 16 dogs is harnessed to a sled and has to cover up to 100 miles a day. Training begins in September, and for this the Stewarts have specially designed carts with rubber wheels that the dogs pull through the woods. Few mushers can survive from their prize money alone; the races are mostly about prestige and the thrill of competition and taking part. “If I had known what I was letting myself in for when my husband brought a husky home…,” says Fiona, laughing. But on a serious note, she adds, “Living with the dogs is very different, very special. You have to devote your whole life to them.” Standing besideNici, she surveys the barking pack. Both women beam.

    Day 4 – 
Glencoe via Aberfeldy to Ballater: There can only be one!

    Since Skyfall, ranger Scott McCombie has often stood right on what is now a famous spot in Glen Etive. In the movie, Bond and his boss, M, break their journey here, and later the Highlands provide the backdrop for a showdown. The last time McCombie was here, he traded his ranger’s gear for a pinstriped suit and struck a cool 007 pose. Photos of the occasion now form part of the Skyfall exhibition the national park which opened soon after the blockbuster’s release in order to attract new visitors. McCombie is quite happy to cash in on Skyfall’s success, as the proceeds will help preserve the beautiful natural scenery here. Lone campers put up their tents beside the streams and hikers lose themselves in the vast glens. “It’s just a pity we don’t have any bears,” says McCombie. At least they have an undaunted agent.

    In the afternoon, we meet Barrie Andrian, 57, an underwater archeologist from the United States, who runs the national Crannog Center. In case you didn’t know: For reasons not yet entirely clear, back in around 500 BCE the ancestors of today’s Scots lived in wooden settlements called crannogs, which they erected as artificial islands in a lake. They likely chose this form of dwelling for protection, but possibly as a status symbol. Andrian and her team have spent many years reconstructing such a crannog – using only original parts and the then customary tools. The result is an impressive exhibit people can step inside and touch. “It’s only wood, but it is so much more, too,” says Andrian. “We are the first people to have touched this wooden floor in 2500 years. To me, it feels like we are touching our ancestors – it’s like a connection with our past.”

    Day 5 – Ballater via Stonehaven to Aberdeen: Catching peace

    This is what tranquility feels like. It’s early morning and we are in waders, standing in the fast-flowing waters of the Dee River as the first rays of the sun reach the riverbank. “It always takes about 20 minutes for people to say, “Wow, this is so peaceful,” says Ian Murray, 50, following up with: “Don’t lose my late grandmother’s handmade fly!” With three elegant swishes of his 15-foot rod, he casts his line. Soon we can see the bright bait being carried along on the surface by the current. Ian has about 100 different flies in his SUV, dozens of them homemade. He is one of the most experienced rangers in the region and takes people from all over the world to the right spots to fish. Right now, all we lack is a proper catch. What was his biggest so far? “My girlfriend!,” says Murray with a laugh. It doesn’t seem to be his lucky day today, though, not a single a salmon bites. Even if one did, this is the closed season, so we would have to throw it back. And anyway, it can also be wonderfully relaxing to catch nothing at all.

    Our last stop is Stonehaven, a pretty fishing village near Aberdeen. When we arrive, skipper Brian Wilkinson, 63, is already waiting to cast off, the engine of the Lady Gail II turning over impatiently. From the sea, we get the best view of the coast and the Dunnottar Castle ruins, and hope to glimpse a passing dolphin or whale. “Photographers usually go overboard first!” is our skipper’s greeting. We see numerous penguins waddling along the shore in front of the camera, but no mammals this time, not even out at sea. The sense of peace that follows a day spent outdoors stays with us even as we travel home. But we will certainly miss the Scottish sense of humor.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Nightlife in Glasgow

    ListMap

    Party lovers will find Glasgow one of the best cities in the UK for late night fun.

    Whether you want to dance your evening away, swig a few beers or enjoy some great live music, Glasgow has got it covered from every angle.

    King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut

    272a St Vincent Street
    G2 5RL Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Glasgow’s best live music venue. Local and international bands pass through, check local listings for details.

    Sub Club

    22 Jamaica Street
    G1 4QD Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Scotland’s most famous club. One for serious dance music fans only.

    Stereo

    22-28 Renfield Lane
    G2 6PH Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    A bar and art space with a nightclub attached. All housed in a Mackintosh building.

    Munro’s

    185 Great Western Road
    G4 9EB Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Booze hounds should head here for the very best craft beers Glasgow has to offer.

    Òran Mór

    Byres Road
    G12 8QX Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    A church turned arts space, hosting big contemporary names in its gig venue.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Glasgow

    ListMap

    The food scene in Glasgow has blossomed in the past few years. New cafés and old haunts have all helped the city earn a worldwide reputation for excellent eating.

    Whether you want to stop for coffee and cake or blow the budget on something fancy, there are endless options.

    Ubiquitous Chip

    2 Ashton Lane
    G12 8SJ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    A Glasgow institution serving the freshest Scottish cuisine and excellent wine.

    Grill On The Corner

    21-25 Bothwell Street
    G2 6NL Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    The best place in the city to taste gorgeous Angus steaks. A trendy spot with a young crowd.

    The Dhabba

    44 Candleriggs
    G1 1LE Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    Sensational Indian food that matches the best curry houses in northern England.

    The Olive Pip

    231 Crow Road
    G11 7PZ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    A little out of the way, but when the coffee is this good, who cares? A great place for lunch too.

    The 78

    10-14 Kelvinhaugh Street
    G3 8NU Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    One for veggies and vegans. Excellent falafel and bean burgers, plus a great array of craft ales.

    Flight and accommodation

    Discover

    Calendar of events

    Glasgow Film Festival

    21 February and 4 March 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various venues

    The festival programme encompasses a huge range of moving image experiences. Visitors can expect entertaining galas, premieres, parties, lively events, celebrities and of course a collection of stunning documentaries from around the world.

    Glasgow Jazz Festival

    20 – 24 June 2018
    Website

    Venue: Royal Bank Big Stage and various venues

    Now sponsored by the Royal Bank of Scotland, the Glasgow Jazz Festival continues to progress, with over 160 separate performances staged each year. Most concerts take place at the Royal Bank Big Stage, aided and abetted by other concert venues and many Fringe venues around the Merchant City area. This is a festival with strong roots and many top names have featured here in past years.

    West End Festival

    30 June – 1 July 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various West End venues and streets

    This old-fashioned community festival and street party take place in Glasgow’s academic and campus quarter and include live music, film screenings, garden fetes, cake stalls, barbecue and family fun days, and a Japanese Matsuri, where visitors put on a kimono, make origami and try their hand at the Japanese alphabet.

    Merchant City Festival

    2 – 12 August 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various venues in Merchant City

    This vibrant arts and entertainment festival takes place in about 70 venues in Glasgow’s rejuvenated cultural quarter. A packed, four-day programme includes music, theatre, comedy, film, food and exhibitions in a list of about 300 events. Past acts include the Urban Rocks Fashion Show, Ceilidh Dance Class, cutting-edge film screenings and street theatre.

    Piping Live!

    13 – 19 August 2018
    Website

    Venue: St Enoch Square and various other venues

    Scottish pipe bands from around the world perform daily for three hours in the middle of Glasgow during the annual Piping Live! event. Daily workshops offer an opportunity to be initiated into the secrets of the bag pipe – the quintessentially Scottish instrument. There are also café pipe jamming sessions, piping lectures, a Festival Club, the World Solo Amateur Piping Competition and the eagerly awaited Pipe Idol competition.

    Glasgow's Hogmanay

    31 December 2018

    Venue: George Square and other venues

    New Year’s Eve celebrations offer the best in Scottish themed entertainment and activities including Highland Dancing, pipe bands, free performances by top Ceilidh bands and much more.

    Celtic Connections

    17 January – 3 February 2019
    Website

    Venue: Glasgow Royal Concert Hall and other venues

    Glasgow’s annual folk, roots and world music festival, Celtic Connections celebrates Celtic music and its connections to cultures across the globe. Typically, over 2,000 musicians from around the world descend on Glasgow and bring the city to life for almost three weeks of concerts, ceilidhs, talks, art exhibitions, workshops and free events.

    Glasgow International Comedy Festival

    14 – 31 March 2019
    Website

    Venue: Various venues

    The Glasgow International Comedy Festival is attracting increasingly bigger and better names, making it one of the most well respected comedy festivals in Britain, rivalling even Edinburgh’s line-ups. Venues range from small pubs to big theatres and concert halls, so you can expect everything from major shows featuring big names on the circuit to little gems by unknown performers. Nearly 300 shows take place at some 40 venues all over Glasgow.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Glasgow

    ListMap

    Unlike nearby Edinburgh, hotels in Glasgow won’t adversely hit your holiday budget.

    There are some excellent five-star spots, but you can get much better value in Scotland’s second city compared to the capital.

    Blythswood Square

    11 Blythswood Square
    G2 4AD Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    A 19th-century gem, this boutique hotel has well-appointed rooms and a superb restaurant.

    Glasgow Radisson Blu

    301 Argyle Street
    G2 8DL Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    This strikingly designed building houses some of Glasgow’s fanciest rooms.

    The Arthouse

    129 Bath Street
    G2 2SZ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A sharp boutique hotel that won’t break the bank. A great central location too.

    Glasgow Pond

    Great Western Road
    G12 0XP Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A handy business hotel away from the bustle of the centre, with smart, quiet rooms.

    Argyll

    973 Sauchiehall Street
    G3 7TQ Glasgow
    United Kingdom
    Show on map

    Category: Cheap

    On a quiet street near Kelvingrove Park, this cosy hotel offers comfortable, affordable rooms.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Monday, 21.05.2018 04:00 UTC

    overcast

    temperature


    11°C


    wind direction

    north

    wind speed

    3.125 mph

    7 days forecast

    Tuesday

    22.05.2018

    13°C / 8°C

    Wednesday

    23.05.2018

    17°C / 8°C

    Thursday

    24.05.2018

    19°C / 8°C

    Friday

    25.05.2018

    19°C / 12°C

    Saturday

    26.05.2018

    17°C / 11°C

    Sunday

    27.05.2018

    17°C / 11°C

    Monday

    28.05.2018

    21°C / 10°C

    Climate & best time to visit Great Britain

    Owing to it being an island, the UK is subject to very changeable weather. Extremes of temperature are rare but snow, hail, heavy rain and heatwaves can occur. For detailed descriptions, see Climate in the respective country sections.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    13 °C

    -17 °C

    13 °C

    -15 °C

    21 °C

    -13 °C

    23 °C

    -6 °C

    27 °C

    -3 °C

    30 °C

    0 °C

    30 °C

    2 °C

    31 °C

    0 °C

    26 °C

    -3 °C

    23 °C

    -7 °C

    16 °C

    -10 °C

    14 °C

    -18 °C

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    111 mm

    85 mm

    69 mm

    67 mm

    63 mm

    70 mm

    97 mm

    93 mm

    102 mm

    119 mm

    106 mm

    127 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    1 h

    2 h

    2 h

    4 h

    6 h

    6 h

    5 h

    4 h

    3 h

    2 h

    1 h

    0 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    86 %

    83 %

    80 %

    76 %

    74 %

    76 %

    78 %

    80 %

    82 %

    84 %

    85 %

    87 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    8 °C

    7 °C

    7 °C

    8 °C

    9 °C

    11 °C

    12 °C

    13 °C

    13 °C

    12 °C

    10 °C

    9 °C

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ precipitationdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan13 °C-17 °C5 °C0 °C86 %111 mm171.1 h
    Feb13 °C-15 °C6 °C1 °C83 %85 mm122.1 h
    Mar21 °C-13 °C8 °C2 °C80 %69 mm102.9 h
    Apr23 °C-6 °C11 °C3 °C76 %67 mm104.7 h
    May27 °C-3 °C15 °C6 °C74 %63 mm106.0 h
    Jun30 °C0 °C17 °C9 °C76 %70 mm106.1 h
    Jul30 °C2 °C18 °C11 °C78 %97 mm135.1 h
    Aug31 °C0 °C18 °C10 °C80 %93 mm144.4 h
    Sep26 °C-3 °C16 °C8 °C82 %102 mm133.7 h
    Oct23 °C-7 °C12 °C7 °C84 %119 mm162.3 h
    Nov16 °C-10 °C8 °C3 °C85 %106 mm141.4 h
    Dec14 °C-18 °C6 °C2 °C87 %127 mm160.8 h
    year31 °C-18 °C12 °C5 °C81 %1109 mm1553.4 h

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone
    Country code: +44

    Mobile telephony and Internet
    Since June 2017, EU citizens traveling within the EU, and also in Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein have been able to use their cell phones and surf the Net without incurring any extra charges: In other words, customers pay the same price for phone calls, text messages and data volume as they do at home. Restrictions do apply to the constant use of SIM cards abroad, however, and caps may be set on data packages. For full details, contact your mobile telephony provider in your country. Travelers using a SIM card from a non-EU state do not benefit from the new arrangement.

    Free Internet access via Wi-Fi is possible in many busy tourist spots. When using public Wi-Fi networks, it is a wise precaution to ensure encryption of all passwords, credit card details and banking TANs entered. Use of a VPN app or security software to check the safety of a hotspot is recommended.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Glasgow

    Key Areas

    Glasgow has fast become one of the UK’s best shopping spots. The so-called Style Mile, in the city centre, plays home to a string of unique boutiques, with over 200 shops to choose from. Head to Princes Street for major international brands.

    Markets

    The Barras is the very best market in Glasgow. Located on Gallowgate and open every weekend, this excellent flea market sells everything from unique souvenirs to vintage clothing. For something more rough and ready, try the Blochairn Market on the edge of town.

    Shopping Centres

    The Style Mile is chock full of excellent shopping malls. The Buchanan Galleries, Princes Street and St Enoch Centre will all delight shopaholics looking for new clothes or a bargain in the sales. The Silverburn Centre on the edge of town does a similar thing, but all under one roof.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    The monarchy, though now only symbolic politically, is a powerful and often subconscious unifying force. Members of the Royal Family are the subject of unceasing fascination, with their every move avidly followed and reported by the popular press, both in the UK and abroad.

    Handshaking is customary when introduced to someone for the first time. One kiss on the cheek is gaining popularity for close friends. Normal social courtesies should be observed when visiting someone’s home and a small present such as flowers or chocolates is appreciated. It is polite to wait until everyone has been served before eating.

    Clothing

    Some nightclubs and restaurants do not allow jeans and trainers, otherwise casual wear is widely acceptable. For business, a suit and tie should be worn, although in some workplaces an open neck is acceptable.

    Use of public places

    Topless sunbathing is allowed on certain beaches and tolerated in some parks. Smoking is banned in all enclosed public places, including stations, pubs and restaurants, throughout the UK.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Food & Drink

    Food within the UK is generally safe to eat, with health and safety standards monitored by various government agencies. Tap water is considered safe to drink but bottled water is widely available. If you’re camping, always boil, filter or purify water from streams.

    Other Risks

    The UK is not a risky destination but travellers should still take appropriate precautions. Summer temperatures in England rarely reach above 30°C but on hot days there is still risk of sunstroke and it’s advisable to wear sunscreen, as well as appropriate clothing. The same goes for winters, during which weather can be very changeable. Waterproofs (or at least a strong umbrella) are mandatory at any time of year. Those hiking in the mountains should come prepared, with appropriate gear and maps if needed but the biggest danger comes from those who disregard warning signs or poor weather.

    Although the risk remains low, travellers are advised to ensure they are fully vaccinated against measles, as cases have risen in the past few years.  Travellers visiting the UK during the winter may also wish to consider being vaccinated against flu.

    If you’re planning to walk in wooded or heath areas such as in the Scottish Highlands, it’s worth taking precautions against tick bites: ensure you wear long-sleeved tops, tuck your socks into your trousers and wear insect repellent. Ticks are known to spread Lyme disease which, although fairly rare in the UK, can affect your skin, joints, heart and nervous system. Symptoms include: a pink or red circular rash which develops around the bite up to 30 days after a person is bitten; flu-like symptoms; headaches; and muscle or joint pain. If left untreated, symptoms can become more serious.

    Midges are a hiker’s and camper’s nemesis, especially in the northwest Highlands during the summer. While they’ll do no worse than cause a multitude of unbearably itchy bites, it’s definitely worth covering up and dousing yourself in insect repellent to ward off these persistent beasties.

    The weather in Scotland can change in an instant. If you’re walking, skiing or climbing in the hills, it’s vital to be prepared for all weathers. It’s not at all uncommon to go for a walk on a beautifully sunny day, only to find yourself surrounded by mist and drizzle with little warning. Make sure you’re equipped with a map, compass, extra food, layers and waterproofs, and always tell someone where you’re heading before you set out. Scots and visitors alike also find themselves unexpectedly caught out by the sun – you might not need it often, but pack some sunscreen.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

    IATA Travel CentreIATA Travel Centre

    Flight and accommodation