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    Rome: Seven hills and a thousand discoveries to make

    Roma, non basta una vita! so the popular saying goes. It means, in Rome, one lifetime is not enough – there’s simply too much to see, eat and experience. Here you’ll find the great icons of the Western world: the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon and St Peter’s Cathedral. Layered atop are neighbourly medieval piazzas, Renaissance palaces and baroque churches and fountains, each corner revealing priceless Bernini sculptures and haunting ruins.

    Unfazed by it all, Romans go about there daily business. Take a leaf out of their book: choose selectively and then soak up the dolce vita vibe by lingering over long, lazy lunches and romantic evening aperitivo.

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    24 hours in Ancient Rome

    ListMap

    If a whole lifetime is not enough to discover Rome, what should you do if you only have one day there? Well, first, you should give up on the idea of being able to “complete” Rome – this city is best enjoyed at a leisurely pace. If you accept that you can only see a small handful of the countless ancient sites and other attractions, you will enjoy it more.

    Our advice to you? If you only have time for a short visit, you should take a walk through the old town, the Centro Storico, where you will find the famous monuments that our walking tour will take you to.

    09:00 a.m. – Hotel Art Rome

    Via Margutta 56
    00187 Rome
    Italy
    Tel.: +39-06/32 87 11
    Show on map

    Hotel bookings in Rome often come down to sheer luck since hotel ratings are just one of the mysteries of the Eternal City. For those who dislike noisy night-time disruptions and want a break from the hustle and bustle of the ancient sites and artworks of Rome, this boutique hotel, with its modern and colourful interior design, is the perfect choice. The hotel offers spacious rooms and is exceptionally quiet by Roman standards. Another plus: The walking tour of the city starts (almost) at its doorstep.

    10:00 a.m. – Piazza di Spagna

    Piazza di Spagna
    00196 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    After a short stroll from the hotel, you’ll find yourself at the Piazza di Spagna with the Scalinata delle Trinità dei Monti (English: Spanish Steps). The set of steps leads from the square and the babbling Fontana della Barcaccia to the Trinità dei Monti church. Later in the day, the steps are a popular meeting and vantage point, so much so that their beautifully curved structure is almost totally obscured.

    12:00 p.m. – View from Campidoglio (Capitoline Hill)

    Piazza del Campidoglio
    00186 Rome
    Ital
    Show on map

    The tour now takes you southwards by bus or on foot to the large Piazza Venezia. From this busy traffic junction, you can head either in the direction of the Piazza del Campidoglio with the town hall, the Senatorial Palace and the Musei Capitolini, or the terrace with the monumental Monumento Vittorio Emanuele II, which offers a stunning view over the Fori Imperiali.

    01:00 p.m. – Forum Romanum and Palatino (Palatine Hill)

    Piazza Santa Maria Nova
    00186 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    On the way up the Palatine Hill you leave the Forum Romanum behind you to your left before being greeted by the view from the hill to the Forum. Take a moment to appreciate the impressive size of this location, which once formed the very heart of the Roman Empire. The hottest hours of the day can be spent quite pleasantly among the gardens and ruins of the Palatine Hill.

    03:00 p.m. – Colosseum

    Piazza del Colosseo
    00184 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    At the Colosseum, near the entrance to the metro station, you can find one of over 2,000 Roman nasoni, public drinking fountains where any passer-by can help themselves. If you’re starting to feel hungry at this point, there are plenty of cafés to choose from in the side streets of the Via di San Giovanni in Laterano. The Colosseum, once the scene of gladiator fights, is considered the largest structure of ancient times – so to view the enormous amphitheatre, you will need to get your strength up.

    05:00 p.m. – Parco del Colle Oppio

    Viale del Monte Oppio
    00184 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    If visiting the Colosseum is a bit too much for you, simply take a short detour to the Parco del Colle Oppio. Its location on the Monte Esquilio may not be the most beautiful in Rome, but it certainly boasts the best views of the Colosseum. In it, you will find the ruins of Emperor Nero’s Domus Aurea (Golden House), the largest and most lavish of the ancient palaces.

    06:00 p.m. – Visit to a gelateria

    Via Principe Eugenio 65-67
    00185 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    It’s now finally time to treat yourself to some real Italian gelato. Near the impressive Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, you will find what is reported to be the oldest ice cream parlour in Rome, Gelateria Fassi. One thing is certain: it is one of the most popular in the city. The gelateria was founded in 1880 and is still under family ownership. All its products are homemade, just as they were back then.

    08:00 p.m. – La Cena (Dinner)

    Via di Monte Testaccio 30
    00153 Rome
    Italy
    Tel.: +39-06/57 43 816
    Show on map

    You’ll be hard-pressed to find a restaurant in Rome serving dinner before 8 pm. In fact, most people dine even later. Early birds, however, will have better chances finding a table, for example at Checchino dal 1887, one of the most well-known venues for classic, local cuisine. This traditional restaurant, still owned by its founding family, serves dishes just as they were in the late 19th century, when the old abattoir next door was still in operation. Since then, the menu has been diversified with modern and vegetarian dishes; and the wine list is as excellent as ever.

    11:00 p.m. – Nightlife in Monte Testaccio

    Monte Testaccio
    00153 Rom
    Italien
    Show on map

    A practical tip: The restaurant, Checchino dal 1887, is located in one of Rome’s most prominent nightlife districts. The classic amongst the clubs there is Radio Londra in Via di Monte Testaccio 67, and is particularly popular with the younger crowd. If you are not in the mood for enclosed spaces, do as the Romans do and go for an evening passeggiata. This leisurely stroll for both seeing and being seen might even take you to the Circo Massimo metro station, from which you can return to the Piazza di Spagna.

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    Top 10 sights in Rome

    ListMap
    The magnificence of Rome’s hills is best appreciated from the banks of the Tiber, from where you can also see the city’s wonderful bridges, here Ponte Vittorio Emanuele II

    Città del Vaticano (Vatican City)

    Piazza San Pietro
    00120 Vatican City
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/69 88 46 76
    Show on map

    Built above the tomb of A-list apostle St Peter is Rome’s iconic basilica, forming the epicentre of the Vatican complex that incorporates Michelangelo’s world-famous Sistine Chapel frescoes and an exhausting feast of art in its adjoining museums.

    Museo e Galleria Borghese

    Piazzale del Museo Borghese
    00197 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/ 84 13 979
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 0830-1930

    If you only have time for one art museum make it this one, housing the heavenly private collection of bon vivant Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1577-1633).

    Musei Capitolini

    Piazza del Campidoglio 1
    00186 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/06 08
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 0900-2000

    The world’s oldest public museum, the Capitoline is crammed with Rome’s finest classical statuary as well as paintings by Titian, Tintoretto and Rubens. The iconic She Wolf, depicting the city’s suckling twins Romulus and Remus, is shown in the Palazzo di Conservatori.

    Galleria Doria Pamphilj

    Via del Corso 305
    00186 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/67 97 323
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0900-1900

    Still home to the aristocratic Pamphilj family, this 15th-century palace is lined with masterpieces, which you can tour with a free audio guide narrated by resident Jonathan Pamphilj, who will fill you in on all the palace scandal.

    Palazzo Massimo alle Terme

    Largo di Villa Peretti 1
    00187 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: 06 3996 7700
    Show on map

    Wander amid a painted garden of climbing roses and pomegranates and sample the good taste of Roman burghers Augustus and his wife Livia Drusilla who commissioned these outstanding frescos.

    Palatine Hill

    Via di San Gregorio 30
    00186 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/39 96 77 00
    Show on map

    This gorgeous hillside shaded by towering pines was the Beverly Hills of ancient Rome. The chosen suburb of emperors and celebrities, its ruined villas and gardens make for a wonderful wander with atmospheric views over the Forum.

    Via Appia Antica

    Via Appia Antica
    Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    This cobblestone highway, which once linked Rome with the Adriatic port of Brindisi, is lined with creepy Christian catacombs. Tour them to see the graves of 16 pontiffs and faded frescos of saints Peter and Paul dating back 1,600 years.

    Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

    Piazza di San Giovanni in Laterano 4
    00184 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/69 88 64 33
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0700-1830

    Despite its bombastic baroque makeover, this gleaming cathedral is Rome’s oldest basilica, founded by Constantine in the 4th century. It’s full of surprising treasures including a fabulous Cosmati tiled floor.

    Museo d’Arte Contemporanea di Roma (MACRO)

    Via Nizza 138
    00198 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/06 08
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 1030-1900

    MACRO’s combination of industrial and contemporary architecture provides the perfect showcase for post-war Italian and international modern art.

    Trastevere

    Piazza di Santa Maria, Trastevere
    00153 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Hop over the Tiber to sample Rome’s ‘left bank’ counter culture amid the cobbled alleys, galleries and bars of Trastevere. It’s less about blockbuster sights here and more about soaking up the vibe.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Italy / Country Information

    Country overview

    Despite incessant praise, travelling in Italy remains one of those rare experiences in life – like a perfect spring day or the power of first love – that cannot be overrated. In few places do history, art, fashion, food and la dolce vita (the good life) intermingle so effortlessly.

    There are sunny isles and electric blue surf, glacial northern lakes and fiery southern volcanoes, rolling vineyards and an urban landscape that harbours more UNESCO World Heritage sites than any other country in the world. Few places offer such variety and few visitors leave without a fervent desire to return.

    Geography

    Italy is situated in Europe, with a long coastline of approximately 7,600km (4,720 miles) stretching into the Mediterranean Sea and a mountainous northern border adjoining France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. This northern Alpine region contains some of the highest peaks in Europe and is a good area for winter sports.

    In central Italy, Tuscany has a diverse landscape composed of fertile rolling hills, lush river valleys, minor mountain ranges and a long sandy coastline. To the east is Umbria, known as the ‘green heart of Italy’; hilly with broad plains, olive groves and pines, and Le Marche – a region of gentle mountains, rivers and small fertile plains.

    Further south lies Rome, Italy’s capital city. Within its precincts is the Vatican City. The south of the country is hotter, wilder and much, much drier than the north, characterised by dry sierras, rocky mountain ranges and volcanic outcrops, including three of Europe’s most active volcanoes: Vesuvius, Etna and Stromboli. Puglia, the ‘heel of the boot’, is a mixed landscape of fertile plateaus, expansive olive groves and flat, ochre-coloured plains. The islands of Sicily and Sardinia lie offshore to the southwest and west respectively.

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Area: 301340 sq km (116348 sq miles).

    Population: 60.5 million (2015).

    Population density: 204.0 per sq km.

    Capital: Rome.

    Language

    The state language is Italian. South Tyrol is officially a bilingual province, where German is the language mainly spoken. In Trentino, Ladin is taught in some schools.

    Currency

    Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 cents.

    Electricity

    230 volts AC, 50Hz. Plugs are of the two round-pin type.

    Public holidays

    In addition to public holidays, local feast days are held in honour of town patron saints, generally without closure of shops and offices.

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2018 – December 2019 period.

    2018

    Capodanno (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2018
    Epifania (Epiphany): 6 January 2018
    Pasqua (Easter Sunday): 1 April 2018
    Lunedì dell’Angelo (Easter Monday): 2 April 2018
    Festa della Liberazione (Liberation Day): 25 April 2018
    Festa del Lavoro (Labour Day): 1 May 2018
    Festa della Repubblica (Republic Day): 2 June 2018
    Assunzione di Maria Vergine (Assumption): 15 August 2018
    Tutti i santi (All Saints’ Day): 1 November 2018
    Immacolata Concezione (Immaculate Conception): 8 December 2018
    Natale (Christmas Day): 25 December 2018
    Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Day): 26 December 2018

    2019

    Capodanno (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2019
    Epifania (Epiphany): 6 January 2019
    Pasqua (Easter Sunday): 21 April 2019
    Lunedì dell’Angelo (Easter Monday): 22 April 2019
    Festa della Liberazione (Liberation Day): 25 April 2019
    Festa del Lavoro (Labour Day): 1 May 2019
    Festa della Repubblica (Republic Day): 2 June 2019
    Assunzione di Maria Vergine (Assumption): 15 August 2019
    Tutti i santi (All Saints’ Day): 1 November 2019
    Immacolata Concezione (Immaculate Conception): 8 December 2019
    Natale (Christmas Day): 25 December 2019
    Santo Stefano (St. Stephen’s Day): 26 December 2019

    All information subject to change.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Discover Rome in a Fiat 500

    Whenever Alvise di Giulio brings his colorful Fiat 500s out of the basement garage, he gleans envious glances from locals and tourists alike: The Italian entrepreneur offers city tours in his small vintage cars (rome500exp.com). His guests take the wheel and drive past the city’s famous attractions while Alvise explains via walkie-talkie what can be seen to right and left, although most drivers are busy enough simply coping with Rome’s traffic. The highlight of the tour is when the drivers come to circle the Colosseum. For those who prefer to travel on two wheels rather than four, a similar tour but on vintage Vespas, also run by Alvise, is also an option.

    Via Ostilia 48
    00184 Roma
    Italy

    Tel.: +39-06/70 49 49 83
    and +39-36/63 06 29 06

    Flight and accommodation

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    Getting around

    Public Transport

    Rome’s two-line metro system is of limited use to travellers. It’s easier to get around on foot, or use the city’s extensive bus and tram system, which is operated by ATAC (tel: +39-6/57 003; www.atac.roma.it). Single tickets are valid for one metro ride or 75 minutes. Daily and three-day passes are better value. Tickets are purchased from vending machines and newsstands and need to be validated at the metro gate or in the machines onboard buses and trams.

    Taxis

    Pick up cabs at designated ranks. Taxis can be booked over the phone, and are metered as soon as you book. Try Radio Taxi (tel: +39-6/35 70) or La Capitale (tel: +39-6/49 94). Tipping isn’t necessary.

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    Nightlife in Rome

    ListMap

    Rome’s drinking dens range from dressy lounge bars to grungy counter-culture hangouts. Between 6pm and 9pm most of them offer aperitivo (drinks accompanied by a free buffet food bar).

    Later, the scene moves on to clubs in Trastevere, Testaccio and Ostiense.

    Stravinskij Bar

    Via del Babuino 9
    00187 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Impossibly romantic cocktail bar in the celeb-magnate Hotel de Russie.

    Lettere Caffè

    Vicolo di San Francesco a Ripa 100-101
    00153 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39 06 97 27 09 91
    Show on map

    A bookshop, bar and gallery hosting live gigs, jazz, comedy and new wave DJ sets.

    Circolo degli Artisti

    Via Casilina Vecchia 42
    00182 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Rome’s best club offering top gigs and DJ sets as well as a cool garden bar.

    Conte Staccio

    Via di Monte Testaccio 65b
    00153 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Under-the-stars dancing and gigs featuring emerging groups.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Restaurants in Rome

    ListMap

    Roman cuisine is rustic and earthy, and the city teams with small, family-run trattorias, wine bars and pizza take-outs.

    But while old-school flavours still dominate, new-school chefs are sexing them up with increasingly creative twists.

    Glass Hostaria

    Vicolo del Cinque 58
    00153 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Price: Luxurious

    Trastevere’s foremost dining address combines modern décor and inventive cooking.

    Open Colonna

    Via Milano 9
    00184 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Price: Luxurious

    New Roman cooking in a stunning glass-roofed dining room in the Palazzo delle Esposizioni.

    Armando al Pantheon

    Salita dei Crescenzi 31
    00186 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    Wood-panelled Armando has been serving traditional Roman dishes for over 50 years.

    Palatium Enoteca Regionale

    Via Frattina 94
    00187 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    A rich showcase of regional wines accompany artisanal cheeses and trad slow-roast pork.

    Pizzarium

    Via della Meloria 43
    00136 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Price: Budget

    A gourmet surprise masquerading as a simple takeaway.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Calendar of events

    Procession of the Cross

    30 March 2018

    Venue: Colosseum

    By far the biggest event of Easter is the famous Via Crucis or ‘Way of the Cross’ procession, when the Pope leads a solemn torchlight procession from the Colosseum to the Palatine Hill to commemorate Christ’s last walk to Mt Golgotha. Along the way, the faithful stop at each of the 14 stations of the cross to say a prayer.

    Rome Marathon

    8 April 2018
    Website

    Venue: Rome

    Rome and Marathons have been connected for centuries. This is a great opportunity to be a part of or simply observe a sport that’s been a tradition for ages.

    Natale di Roma (Rome's birthday)

    21 April 2018

    Venue: Aventine Hill

    Not every city celebrates its birthday, but Rome does on 21 April each year. It was Romulus, suckled by a she-wolf as an infant, who went on to found the city in 753BC. Romans today celebrate the event with bands on Piazza del Campidoglio and fireworks over the River Tiber. Rome’s monuments, archaeological sites and many museums allow free entry on the day.

    Mostra delle Azalee

    April – May 2018

    Venue: Spanish Steps

    To herald the coming spring, the photogenic Spanish Steps are adorned with over 3,000 vases of azaleas. The pink, white and red blooms cover the steps in a profusion of vibrant colour making for a perfect photo opportunity.

    Primo Maggio

    May 2018
    Website

    Venue: Piazza San Giovanni

    Each year on Labour Day, Rome celebrates with a free rock concert on Piazza San Giovanni. Over 700 artists line up for a turn on the stage before a huge crowd, occasionally joined by a high profile guest artist. The event began in 1989 and quickly grew into a major popular event, heavily covered by TV and the press. Get there early for a good view of the stage.

    Festa di San Giovanni

    23 – 24 June 2018

    Venue: Piazza San Giovanni

    Many celebrate the birth of St John the Baptist especially around his namesake church the monolithic, white Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano. During the festival, stalls serving pork roasted with herbs, snails and other local specialities are set up in front of the basilica. At night, the piazza is lit by torches.

    Estate Romana (Roman Summer)

    June – September 2018

    Venue: Rome’s parks, archaeological sites, villas and courtyards

    Between June and September, Rome’s city council puts on a summer calendar of events that turns the city into an outdoor stage. The programme encompasses music, dance, literature and film and events are staged at some of Rome’s most attractive parks, archaeological sites, villas and private courtyards.

    Festa di Noantri

    July 2018
    Website

    Venue: Piazza Santa Maria, Trastevere

    This festival is a celebration of the district’s working-class heritage and of the Madonna of Mount Carmel. Held in one of Rome’s most lively nightlife quarters, you can expect plenty of food, wine and dancing. The event culminates with an impressive fireworks display.

    RomaEuropa Festival

    September – December 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various locations

    Dedicated to featuring the very best contemporary artistic performances in the fields of music, theatre, opera and dance, the RomaEuropa festival is a huge cultural undertaking. Performances by emerging and leading international artists are showcased in special locations throughout the city as well as the main arts centre, the Auditorium Parco della Musica.

    Rome International Film Festival

    October 2018
    Website

    Venue: Auditorium Parco della Musica

    A real red-carpet event Rome’s nascent film festival showcases a varied programme of international premieres, documentaries, retrospectives, exhibitions, concerts and live shows. Inaugurated in 2006, it draws a bevy of A-list celebrities such as Martin Scorcese, Meryl Streep and Susan Sarandon as well as local stars such as Monica Bellucci.

    Christmas Mass

    24. December 2018
    Website

    Venue: St Peter’s Basilica

    The second largest church in the Christian world, the 16th-century St Peter’s Basilica in Rome provides a moving setting for the celebration of Christ’s birth. Each Christmas Eve the Pope gives Midnight Mass in St Peter’s Square. Attended by a vast crowd of pilgrims, the speech is broadcast to over 40 countries. Visitors to this occasion need to reserve tickets through the Prefettura della Casa Pontificia.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Hotels in Rome

    ListMap

    Rome’s outward beauty can often mask overpriced, under-serviced hotels. While five-star beauties are thick on the

    ground, you’ll need to look harder for good-value mid-range options and book early, particularly in summer.

    Lord Byron

    Via Giuseppe de Notaris 5
    00197 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Category: Luxurious

    An art deco beauty situated on the north side of the Borghese Park.

     

    Hotel Farnese

    Via Alessandro Farnese 30
    00192 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Boutique rooms in a neoclassical villa with rooftop views of St Peter’s dome.

    Residenza Domiziano

    Via San Nicola da Tolentino 50
    00187 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Sleek, stylish modern digs within walking distance of Piazza Navona and the Spanish Steps.

    Domus Colosseo Hotel

    Via Marco Aurelio 37A
    00184 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Baroque furniture and walls dressed in yellow silk give the Romance Hotel a gilded sheen.

    Amica Roma B&B

    Via Antonio Baiamonti 2
    00195 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Category: Budget

    This friendly B&B provides a home from home in pretty Prati.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Outdoor adventures in Vancouver

    ListMap

    Wild woods, steep slopes, rough waters: Vancouver, the metropolis on the west coast of Canada, has all of these right on its doorstep. No wonder locals and tourists alike want one thing above all else: to get out into the great outdoors!

    Grouse Mountain: steep slopes on Vancouver’s home peak

    6400 Nancy Greene Way
    North Vancouver, BC V7R 4K9
    Canada
    Tel. +1/604-980 93 11
    Show on map

    Admire a glorious, snow-covered mountain panorama as you stroll barefoot along the warm sands of the Pacific shore – in Vancouver, you can do just that! The mountains at the city’s back rise well over a thousand meters above sea level. Mount Fromme boasts spectacular bike descents, while neighboring Grouse Mountain is legendary for its truly sweat-inducing climb. The steep path to the summit covers a little less than three kilometers, but along the way, there is a difference in altitude of 900 meters to be overcome. The record time for the climb is 25 minutes, but it takes most hikers one and a half to two hours to reach the top. In winter the Grouse Grind trail is closed, but then the ski and snowboard runs (some of them extremely challenging) of Vancouver’s best-known mountain are open to winter sports fans. Another very popular activity is exploring Grouse Mountain on snowshoes along its marked snowshoe trails.

    Wilderness with skyscrapers: Stanley Park

    Borders to the northwest on downtown Vancouver
    Vancouver
    Canada
    Tel. +1/604-873 70 00 (Vancouver city hotline)
    Show on map

    Directly bordering high-rise downtown Vancouver, it is larger than New York’s Central Park and – unlike most urban green areas – a genuine wilderness: Vancouver’s Stanley Park with its gnarled, centuries-old maple trees. Eagles circle above their crowns, while the occasional raccoon and coyote rustles through the undergrowth. Located on a peninsula extending out into the Pacific, the park is encircled by the Seawall, a coastal promenade popular with joggers and inline skaters. Beach volleyball is played on several public bathing beaches, and there are public tennis courts and a pitch-and-putt golf course on the park’s perimeter.

    Shopping at Canada’s biggest outdoor store

    130 West Broadway
    Vancouver, V5Y 1P3
    Canada
    Tel. +1/604-872 78 58
    Show on map

    Unspoiled forests, rugged mountains, rough waters: Vancouver really isn’t short of challenging destinations for adventure lovers. But even for day trips, having the proper equipment is important: Set off without and you could soon find yourself regretting it! In Vancouver, the place to stock up on all the gear for shorter and longer expeditions into the wilds is giant outdoor store MEC. Sleeping bag, snowshoes, thermals, kayak or mountain bike – MEC has everything it takes to put a gleam in an eager adventurer’s eye. In the unlikely event that you don’t find what you need here, simply take a few steps around the corner to MEC’s neighboring outdoor specialists, which include a shop specializing in the iconic Swedish brand Fjällräven.

    Treetop trails: Capilano Suspension Bridge Park

    3735 Capilano Road
    V7R 4J1 Vancouver
    Canada
    Tel. +1-604/985 74 74
    Show on map

    A narrow suspension bridge spans the steep gorge where, 70 meters below, you can hear the rush of the Capilano River. The Capilano Suspension Bridge is one of Vancouver’s best-known outdoor attractions. The same applies to the neighboring Cliffwalk, a semicircular series of walkways, bridges and platforms protruding from a granite rock face and on a level with the treetops. Thanks to an entire network of other platforms and bridges, you can enjoy a squirrel’s perspective of the forest. Next door, an exhibition of totem poles gives visitors an insight into the time when only the Canadian First Nations inhabited the area – the tradition of these gigantic sculptures is said to have originated in this region.

    Paths across the water: kayak tours

    Kayak and stand-up paddleboard rentals and tours
    Various locations, including Granville Island in the center of town and a little further out on Jericho Beach
    Canada
    Tel. +1/604-689 75 75
    Show on map

    Many parts of Vancouver are located right on the coast and have long beaches and coastal promenades so conditions could not be better for exploring the area by kayak, canoe or stand-up paddleboard. Fantastic beaches, hidden coves and offshore islands all provided by a number of operators all year round. If you only want to venture out onto the water for an hour or two, then False Creek is the ideal place to paddle the waves against the high-rise downtown backdrop. An affordable alternative for visitors who prefer a sea trip that requires no personal exertion is the roughly ten-minute ride on the Seabus ferry, which shuttles back and forth across the fjord between downtown and north Vancouver from 6 am daily.

    Whistler: Excursion to the winter sports Mecca

    Roughly 90 mins (by car) north of Vancouver
    Canada
    Tel. +1/800-944 78 53 (Tourism Whistler)
    Show on map

    Out of the way there! The bobsleighs racing down the Olympic track in Whistler reach speeds of up to 125 kilometers per hour. Here, bob beginners can even snag a ride down the ice channel with experienced pilots. For winter sports fans wishing to try out as biathletes, it’s worth making the 90-minute drive to Whistler, where beginner courses are available. At the 2010 Winter Olympics, the famous resort was the venue for several disciplines, and both professional and hobby athletes love its breathtaking ski and snowboard. In summer, Whistler beckons with mountain biking, rafting and zip lining, as well as relaxation on hiking trails and the golf course.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Tuesday, 20.02.2018 15:00 UTC

    overcast

    temperature


    11°C


    wind direction

    north

    wind speed

    2.5 mph

    humidity

    48%

    7 days forecast

    Wednesday

    21.02.2018

    11°C / 4°C

    Thursday

    22.02.2018

    8°C / 4°C

    Friday

    23.02.2018

    11°C / 6°C

    Saturday

    24.02.2018

    13°C / 6°C

    Sunday

    25.02.2018

    10°C / 6°C

    Monday

    26.02.2018

    13°C / 3°C

    Tuesday

    27.02.2018

    14°C / 9°C

    Climate and best time to visit Rome

    Spring and autumn are the best times to visit the Italian capital to enjoy a roster of high-profile festivities such as Easter, the feasts of Saints Peter and Paul and the Roma Europa arts festival. The weather, too, is warm but not too hot, and markets are filled with plump produce. In summer, hot and humid weather drives Romans to the country and seaside and the city becomes very quiet. Winter, conversely, is mild and often sunny and offers lots of good bargains and wonderful Christmas markets.

    Climate & best time to visit Italy

    Italy is a great destination to visit year round, particularly if taking a city break, though for the warmest and most reliable weather April to June is the prime tourist season. Most Italians take their holiday in July and August so prices, and crowds, can soar during these months, which are also the hottest of the year. If you’re keen to avoid the main scrum of peak season but still bank on mild weather, late September to October is a good choice.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    20 °C

    -7 °C

    23 °C

    -7 °C

    25 °C

    -6 °C

    29 °C

    -2 °C

    33 °C

    1 °C

    38 °C

    5 °C

    39 °C

    10 °C

    40 °C

    9 °C

    40 °C

    4 °C

    32 °C

    2 °C

    24 °C

    -4 °C

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    -6 °C

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    69 mm

    71 mm

    63 mm

    56 mm

    55 mm

    31 mm

    9 mm

    22 mm

    64 mm

    115 mm

    111 mm

    94 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    3 h

    4 h

    5 h

    5 h

    7 h

    9 h

    11 h

    10 h

    7 h

    5 h

    4 h

    3 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    72 %

    69 %

    66 %

    65 %

    61 %

    58 %

    53 %

    55 %

    62 %

    70 %

    73 %

    74 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    14 °C

    13 °C

    13 °C

    14 °C

    17 °C

    21 °C

    23 °C

    24 °C

    23 °C

    20 °C

    18 °C

    15 °C

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ precipitationdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan20 °C-7 °C11 °C3 °C72 %69 mm83.7 h
    Feb23 °C-7 °C12 °C4 °C69 %71 mm94.8 h
    Mar25 °C-6 °C15 °C6 °C66 %63 mm85.1 h
    Apr29 °C-2 °C19 °C9 °C65 %56 mm85.9 h
    May33 °C1 °C23 °C13 °C61 %55 mm77.3 h
    Jun38 °C5 °C28 °C17 °C58 %31 mm49.3 h
    Jul39 °C10 °C31 °C19 °C53 %9 mm211.2 h
    Aug40 °C9 °C30 °C19 °C55 %22 mm210.0 h
    Sep40 °C4 °C27 °C17 °C62 %64 mm57.3 h
    Oct32 °C2 °C21 °C13 °C70 %115 mm85.2 h
    Nov24 °C-4 °C16 °C8 °C73 %111 mm104.4 h
    Dec21 °C-6 °C12 °C5 °C74 %94 mm103.5 h
    year40 °C-7 °C20 °C11 °C65 %760 mm816.5 h

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Telephone & Internet

    Telephone
    Country code: +39

    Mobile telephony and Internet
    Since June 2017, EU citizens traveling within the EU, and also in Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein have been able to use their cell phones and surf the Net without incurring any extra charges: In other words, customers pay the same price for phone calls, text messages and data volume as they do at home. Restrictions do apply to the constant use of SIM cards abroad, however, and caps may be set on data packages. For full details, contact your mobile telephony provider in your country. Travelers using a SIM card from a non-EU state do not benefit from the new arrangement.

    Free Internet access via Wi-Fi is possible in many busy tourist spots. When using public Wi-Fi networks, it is a wise precaution to ensure encryption of all passwords, credit card details and banking TANs entered. Use of a VPN app or security software to check the safety of a hotspot is recommended.

    Flight and accommodation

    Offers

    Partner offers in Rome

    The Vatican Museum

    Yet another reason to fly to Rome with Lufthansa Group thanks to the partnership with one of the world’s most famous Museums.

    Passengers flying from or to Rome with Lufthansa, Austrian Airlines, Brussels Airlines or SWISS who wish to visit the Vatican Museum, will be entitled, upon presenting their boarding card within seven days of the flight date, to a preferential “skip the line” entry.

    Viale Vaticano
    00165 Rome
    Italy
    Tel: +39-06/69 88 33 32

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Rome

    Key Areas

    Via Condotti is Rome’s designer strip, with similarly upmarket tributaries running off Piazza di Spagna. For something more authentic, check out the independent boutiques along Via del Governo Vecchio in the historic centre and in the Monti district. Antique and art stores line Via Margutta, Via dei Banchi Vecchi and Via dei Coronari, the latter famous for its antiques fair, while high-street labels concentrate on Via del Corso and Via Nazionale.

    Markets

    Rome’s biggest and busiest markets are the enormous Porta Portese Flea Market in Trastevere, the Trionfale food market in Prati and the Testaccio covered market near MACRO. A smaller, more picturesque market is the Campo dei Fiori food market in the historic centre.

    Shopping Centres

    Shopping in Rome is all about small independent stores. Of the few shopping malls that exist, the art nouveau Galleria Alberto Sordi is the most convenient on Via del Corso. Otherwise, the enormous RomaEst (romaest.cc) is situated 20km (12 miles) east of town.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social conventions

    The social structure is heavily influenced by the Roman Catholic Church and, generally speaking, family ties are stronger than in most other countries in Western Europe. Normal social courtesies should be observed. Dress is casual but smart in most places, and beachwear should be confined to the beach. Conservative clothes are expected when visiting religious buildings and smaller, traditional communities.

    Formal wear is usually indicated on invitations. Smoking is prohibited in public buildings, transport and cinemas. When visiting an Italian home for dinner, bring a small gift of sweets or chocolate, and dress well. Let your host lead when sitting and starting the meal. Take a small portion of what’s on offer as you will surely be cajoled into having another helping. If you do not want more wine, leave your glass full so it cannot be refilled.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Health

    Emergency telephone number: 112

    Lyme disease, TBE (tick-borne encephalitis) and leishmaniosis are all diseases which are passed on by ticks and mosquitoes and also occur in Spain. Clothing that covers the skin and insect repellents provide protection.

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis B occur all over Spain. A hepatitis A vaccination is generally recommended. Visitors planning an extended stay and close contact with the local population, and generally with children and young people, should also have a hepatitis B vaccination.

    Measles and whooping cough occur in Spain. Before traveling to Spain, visitors should definitely check whether their vaccinations are up to date and if necessary, get a booster shot.

    Epidemic outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis occur in Spain. Visitors should seek protection by getting a vaccination and avoiding large crowds. Children and young people, in particular, should be vaccinated. According to the latest recommendations, the vaccination applies as required travel vaccination for extended stays for certain groups of people (teenagers, school and university students). Visitors should consult their physician regarding the need for vaccination in the light of recommendations in the country of destination.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Dr. Heinz, Andreas
    Via della Stazione di San Pietro 45
    00165 Rome
    Italy
    Tel. +39-06-39387984

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

    IATA Travel CentreIATA Travel Centre

    Flight and accommodation

    Discover

    On the coffee trail in and around San José

    ListMap

    Coffee used to play the role tech companies play today in Costa Rica: of foreign exchange earner, image creator and job engine. In its golden age of coffee growing in the 19th century, the once poor country created the basis for wealth and political stability.

    More recently, in 1989, a law was enacted to guarantee the consistently high quality of the coffee produced,  which stipulates that only Arabica beans may be grown – in mild temperatures and mostly at higher altitudes. Our guide to the coffee trail in and around San José.

    Café Franco

    Avenida 7, Casa 3166
    San José
    Costa Rica
    Tel. +506-40 82 70 06
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    daily, 0700-0900

    From among the nearly 400 locally grown coffee varieties, César Madriz picked just 14 for the café he recently opened in the trendy gastronomic district Escalante. He personally roasts the beans once a week. The 27-year-old barista learned his trade from his coffee producer father and runs the Franco alongside his business partner, Brandon Mais, who hails from San Francisco. The café has a pleasantly loungy atmosphere with a modern jazz soundtrack, laurel-wood tables and an exquisite little flower shop in the middle. It also offers tasty confections from its own bakery to accompany your cafecito, which comes in the form of espresso, cappuccino or macchiato from the  machine or classic black from the Chemex, a special glass carafe for a slow-pour and drip method that coaxes more flavor from the beans. If you like the sound of a one-hour coffee workshop, drop a line to info@franco.cr.

    Espíritu Santo Coffee Estate: Coffee tour

    Naranjo, Province Alajuela
    Costa Rica
    Approx. 50 mins northwest of San José
    Tel. +506-24 50 38 38
    Show on map

    Coffeetour:
    daily 0800/0930/1330 and 1500

    While on a visit to Germany two years ago, one thing in particular struck Vera Rojas Morales: “The Germans drink so much coffee!” Because it usually tastes “bitter and strong,” they often sweeten it, although “good coffee needs no sugar,” says the Espíritu Santo manager. Good coffee is what you get when, as in Costa Rica – and therefore also on her coffee plantation – the coffee ripens on volcanic soil, where it can develop a balanced acidity and fruity notes. Rojas Morales took over the more than100-year-old estate in the hills of the tiny village of Naranjo from her father. It encompasses 2300 small farms, often run by women, who bring their harvests to a cooperative. There, the beans are only fermented and then sold “green” to countries all over the world, where they will later be freshly roasted – at Starbucks, for example. Every step, from cultivation to sale (shop!) is described and illustrated on the coffee tour, which includes tastings. Visitors also learn that the estate has already met the official national target for 2021, which is to ensure 100-percent climate-neutral operation.

    Alma de Café

    Café at the Teatro Nacional
    Avenida Central, 5015-1000
    San José
    Costa Rica
    Tel. +506-20 10 11 00
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    daily 0900-1800 (except Sundays)

    All of them –  , from “Ike” Eisenhower, Che Guevara and Fidel Castro to Helmut Kohl and the Dalai Lama – wanted to experience it, the “soul of coffee” at the National Theater of Costa Rica, a building funded by the coffee aristocracy. Sitting at a Viennese-style coffeehouse table beneath a magnificent ceiling fresco, you will be served the country’s most famous beverage – from one of seven provinces, according to your preference. But first, it’s worth taking a look around the building and especially at a large mural dating from 1897, which is considered part of the nation’s identity even though it contains three errors: a banana plant growing the wrong way up and a white-skinned coffee picker on a plantation that’s right beside the ocean.

    Kuö Spa for a coffee body scrub and wrap

    Marriott Hotel San José
    La Ribera de Belen
    Heredia
    Costa Rica
    Show on map

    Coffee isn’t just an enlivening beverage, it perks us up on the outside, too. In the tasteful, tranquil surroundings of the Kuö Spa in the grounds of the Marriott Hotel, hotel guests and other visitors (please arrange an appointment) can let themselves be cocooned in the aromatic powder (body wrap) or treat themselves to a coffee body scrub. The coffee grounds come straight from the neighboring coffee plantation and are supposed to cleanse the skin (kuö in the indigenous language Cabécar) and nourish it with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. For a fresh, lively look rather than a caffeine-induced flush, maybe after a long flight.

    Café Central at San José’s Mercado Central

    Café Central
    Mercado Central
    Avenida Central, bzw. Av. 1
    San José
    Costa Rica
    Show on map

    Virtually everything colones (the local currency) can buy has been on sale at the central market in San José since 1880 – even livestock in the early days. For decades now, Costa Rican coffee has been on sale at the corner stand of the Café Central, right across from the entrance to Avenida 1. Just follow your nose and the promising rattle of the roaster as it constantly turns out freshly browned beans. Barista Patricia and the rest of the staff know all the nuances of the different varieties: What’s it to be? A mild, aromatic café negro from the Tarrazu highlands, or an intense caracolillo brewed from small, snail-shaped beans? Patricia first pours the coffee into a small pot of hot water and then lets it trickle through the traditional chorreador, a kind of cotton sock suspended from a wooden stand. Chorreadors can be purchased at the café as well as from market stalls selling household goods.

    Café Rica – Coffee liqueur from Salicsa

    Salsas y Licores de Costa Rica
    Escazú, Apdo 264-1017
    San José
    Costa Rica
    Tel. +506-22 89 41 21
    Show on map

    Café Rica (rich coffee) is to the Ticos, as Costa Ricans call themselves, what Kahlúa is to the Mexicans: a sweet, highly potent coffee liqueur made with genuine Arabica. Café Rica has been around since 1978, when it was first created by Edward Drew, a Jamaican and a keen cook who had relocated to his mother’s native country. The success of his company, Salicsa, and of its Golden Cream is founded on this very palatable beverage. The cream liqueur contains plenty of Café Rica, but unlike its Irish counterpart, Baileys, no chocolate extract. Café Rica makes a fine last-minute souvenir from the Duty Free Shop at Juan Santamaría International Airport in San José.

    Finca Rosa Blanca boutique hotel

    Finca Rosa Blanca
    3009 Santa Bárbara
    Costa Rica
    Approx. 50 minutes from San José and just under 30 from the airport
    Tel. +506-22 69 93 92
    Show on map

    To escape the hubbub and the congested streets of San José and enjoy the rich natural countryside close to the capital, check in at this country inn at the heart of an over 120 000-square-meter organic coffee plantation, where the coffee “cherries” are left to ripen at their leisure in the shade. From the infinity pool, which is fed by the hotel’s own spring, you can look across to volcanoes and down into Central Valley and San José. The 13 suites with their whitewashed walls, intricate Gaudí-style arts and crafts and ample terraces amid lush greenery invite you to linger longer. And there’s more: The fusion dishes made from ingredients grown in the hotel’s own organic gardens and served at the El Tigre Vestido restaurant as well as a guided tour of the plantation are sure to give you a lasting “coffee baron” feeling.

    Flight and accommodation

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    Best of modern Rome

    ListMap

    Rome’s historical center is included as an ensemble among UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. Some 25,000 places of historical and archeological interest are said to be located within this protected area. Is there even room here for contemporary architecture? It certainly isn’t easy to find, since plans for modern additions to the city center are regularly met with obstruction:

    For one thing, remnants of Roman and medieval buildings are still hidden in the ground so that any excavation work can become a costly undertaking, and for another, not only local political dramas and protests, but also construction and funding glitches can make ambitious projects quite an ordeal to realize. Obstacles notwithstanding, in the past 20 years star architects like Richard Meier and Renzo Piano have done their bit toward creating Rome’s new image. We bring you six spectacular works.

    Macro Museum for Contemporary Art

    Via Nizza, 138-140
    00198 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Red and black: A lipstick-red auditorium and a former brewery hall painted matte black form the core of the new exhibition rooms of the Macro Museum. Parisian architects Odile Decq and Benoît Cornette used contrasts and color to create smooth transitions between the museum’s different levels, the old substance of the industrial building and the new core, the abstract art garden on the roof and the exhibitions rooms on different floors. The permanent exhibition includes postmodern Italian art that spans the works of the Forma 1 group to those of the Nuova Scuola Romana of Piero Pizzi Cannella,  Marco Tirelli et al. The museum’s bathrooms provide an eccentric highlight with washbasins set in a central block of white plastic and equipped with motion detectors, which not only dispense water and hot air, but also produce a crazy flashing of red lights.

    Auditorium Parco della Musica

    Viale Pietro de Coubertin 30
    00196 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Three concert halls, their contours inspired by musical instruments, lie like giant beetles gathered around an amphitheater. Each seats between 750 and 2800 visitors. Flexibility is the key feature of the interiors, all of which are lined with cherrywood paneling to ensure good acoustics. The new auditorium designed by Renzo Piano was opened in 2002 and has a checkered history. That’s because in Rome, you cannot delve more than a couple of meters down, not even outside the historical center, without the risk of uncovering ancient walls. In 1995, when the ground was dug in preparation for the auditorium’s foundations, the remains of a Roman villa dating from the 4th century B.C. came to light – and construction promptly ground to a halt, prompting a smart reaction from architect Piano, who designed the Centre Pompidou in Paris and contributed to the creative work on Potsdam Square in Berlin: He incorporated the ruins into his design, so that today there is an archeological museum in the middle of the Parco della Musica.

    MAXXI National Museum of XXI (21st) Century Arts

    Via Guido Reni, 2
    00196 Rome
    Italy
    Show on map

    Is it the art or the building in which it is housed that’s the star of the show at the MAXXI museum? Visitors to the museum are initially fascinated by the passageways, corners and loops formed by the concrete inside the building. The Romans call it “tagliatelle” because the building designed by Zaha Hadid (seemingly) features the same lack of order as a plate of pasta. Beginning in the foyer, staircases wind upward, walls curve, light channels flow along ceilings. After recovering from the impression of the foyer, visitors enter the first of the five galleries intended for architectural exhibits. Ramps and stairs lead into the other galleries, which offer ever-new spaces and corners for artworks. The high point of the museum is gallery number 5, nearly 23 meters up, which extends out over the piazza and affords fascinating views. Tip for people who enjoy a sense of vertigo: There’s a window set into the floor through which you can see down into gallery number 3.

    Jubilee Church Dio Padre Misericordioso

    Largo Terzo millennio 8
    00155 Rom
    Italy
    Show on map

    Light comes from a divine source, but few modern buildings use it to such virtuosic effect as the Dio Padre Misericordioso church, or “Jubilee Church.” The American architect Richard Meier built it in the Tor Tre Teste district on the outskirts of Rome as one of 50 new churches in a millennium project sponsored by the Archdiocese of Rome. By day, the church’s interior is flooded with natural light that enters between three pure-white concrete sails – representing the Holy Trinity – and illuminates the altar of white Roman travertine. From the outside, the building is a magnificent sight, especially at night, when the interior is illuminated and its sculptural lines are accentuated. So whatever time of day you choose to visit, your lengthy journey will certainly be rewarded.

    Museum Ara Pacis

    Lungotevere in Augusta
    00186 Rom
    Italy
    Show on map

    The new museum building designed by Richard Meier encloses the Ara Pacis Augustae, the Emperor Augustus’ altar dating from the year 9 B.C.E., which is dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of peace. Fragments of the altar had been scattered across the world since its discovery in the 16th century C.E. It was not until Mussolini commissioned it – for propaganda purposes – that the fragments were pieced together again and the altar was exhibited, starting in 1938, in a specially created building on Piazza Augusto. Of that structure only one wall remains. Like those of Meier’s new building, it was made of Roman travertine (a type of limestone). The building with its glass facade 13 meters high and 50 meters long and floor space of 4000 square meters was for a long time one of the most controversial construction projects in Rome. The question of whether it disfigures or enhances the historical old town sparked many a heated debate.

    Eataly Center

    Piazzale 12 Ottobre 1492
    00154 Rom
    Italy
    Show on map

    When Italy was chosen to be the host country for the 1990 FIFA World Cup, a new rail connection had to be created between Fiumicino Airport and downtown Rome. Spanish architect Julio Lafuente was commissioned with the design of an extension to the terminal train station Ostiense. What he created was the Air Terminal, the name and look of which recall an airport building. But the rail link concept was not viable in the long run resulting in the station being incorporated into the subway network. The elegant terminal building stood empty for some time, but since 2012, not only has the train station has been rediscovered, for long-distance services, but also the neighboring four-story terminal building. The slow-food chain Eataly opened a gourmet temple for regional produce there, with small theme restaurants, an in-house brewery and specialty stores selling Italian delicacies. The choice is huge and the shopping convenient, especially when you consider that the Romans have always traditionally bought their groceries at small inner-city delis.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Food & Drink

    Tap water is generally safe to drink. Bottled water is available. The inscription ‘Acqua Non Potabile’ means water is not drinkable. Milk is generally pasteurised and dairy products are safe for consumption. Past outbreaks of brucellosis in southern regions means unpasteurised buffalo mozzarella is best avoided. Local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit and vegetables are considered safe to eat.

    Other Risks

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) also recommends vaccinations for measles, mumps, rubella, polio and hepatitis B.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Dr. Heinz, Andreas
    Via della Stazione di San Pietro 45
    00165 Rome
    Italy
    Tel. +39-06-39387984

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.

    Flight and accommodation