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Lufthansa Travelguide Frankreich Toulouse

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Lufthansa Travelguide Frankreich Toulouse

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... Toulouse

Lufthansa Travelguide Frankreich Toulouse

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Lufthansa Travelguide Frankreich Toulouse

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City map Toulouse

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    Toulouse – a brief overview

    Sitting on the Garonne River and the Canal du Midi, France’s fourth largest city is a heady combination of influences drawn from Spain and the Pyrenees to the south, the Mediterranean to the southeast and the Atlantic to the west. Nicknamed ‘the pink city’ due to its abundance of Romanesque pink-brick buildings, its historic centre is packed with enough architectural

    treasures and medieval buildings to fill a weekend alone. But that’s just the half of it. With a strong economy thanks to its cutting-edge aviation industry, Toulouse is a thoroughly modern place whose rugby-loving populace and large annual influx of students enjoy world-class cuisine and a vibrant social scene.

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    Lufthansa Travelguide Frankreich Toulouse
    The Place du Capitole is the city's magnificent main square

    Capitole

    Place du Capitole
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Housing the town hall, national theatre and opera house, the capitole has been the seat of municipal power since the 12th century. Inside the vast pink marble building, find ornately decorated rooms including the ‘salle des illustres’.

    Saint-Sernin Basilica

    Place Saint Sernin
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/61 21 80 45
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 0830-1900
    Sun 0830-1930 (Jun-Sep)
    Mon-Sat 0830-1800
    Sun 0830-1930 (Oct-May)

    Constructed between 1080 and 1120 on the site of a fourth-century basilica, this Romanesque church was an important stop on the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela.

    Saint-Etienne Cathedral

    Place Saint Etienne
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/61 52 03 82
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0800-1900
    Sat-Sun 0900-1900

    Built over five centuries, this cathedral is an interesting mix of architectural styles. Visit for its lovely rose window, vast choir and 17 chapels.

    Les Jacobins Monastery

    Le Parvis des Jacobins, entry via Rue Lakanal
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/61 22 23 82
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 1000-1800

    Built for an order of Dominican monks in the 13th century, this brick monastery with its beautiful cloister is hugely impressive. Don’t miss the Saint Antonin chapel with its 14th-century murals.

    Les Abattoirs

    76 allées Charles-de-Fitte
    31300 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/62 48 58 00
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun 1200-1800
    Thu 1200-2000

    Formerly Toulouse’s slaughterhouse, this museum of modern art includes Picasso’s Body of the Minotaur in a harlequin costume, which, due to its fragility, is only exhibited for half the year.

    Jardin des Plantes

    Allée Frédéric Mistral
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/62 27 48 48
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily from 0745;
    closing times vary throughout the year.

    Dating from the French Revolution, this is the oldest public park in Toulouse. Take a stroll amid its 100 species of deciduous trees and conifers.

    Canal du Midi

    Canal du Midi

    France
    Show on map

    This important trade route and now UNESCO World Heritage site has linked Toulouse with Sète on the Mediterranean since in the 17th century.

    Let’s Visit Airbus

    Allée André Turcat
    31700 Blagnac
    France
    Tel: +33-5/34 39 42 00
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat (by appointment only)

    Constructed in Toulouse, the Airbus 380 is a giant of passenger aviation. See where and how the Airbus is assembled during a visit to the factory on the outskirts of the city.

    La Cité de l’Espace

    Avenue Jean Gonord
    31506 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-5/67 22 23 24
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Various; see website for schedule

    Exploring man’s conquest of space, this vast complex boasts 250 interactive exhibits, an IMAX cinema, a planetarium and an outdoor area housing a MIR space station and a full-size Ariane 5 satellite launcher.

    Stade Ernest Wallon

    114 Rue des Troènes
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel: +33-892/69 31 15
    Show on map

    Rugby Union is something of a religion in these parts. Toulouse’s team, Stade Toulousain, is in France’s premier league. A trip to see them play at home is a must for any rugby fan.

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    Country information

    Country overview

    You could spend a lifetime’s worth of holidays in France and still not feel as though you’d done the country justice. It remains one of the planet’s most visited tourist destination, meriting this lofty standing with an almost overwhelming mass of historical treasures, storybook landscapes and cultural idiosyncrasies. The teeming glam of Paris makes for one hell of a centrepiece, matching any city on the planet for ambiance, individuality and set-piece sights.

    But the real beauty of France, in many ways, lies in the seemingly endless list of travel treats elsewhere. The country’s natural gifts are striking, with white sands, hulking mountains and fecund swathes of rolling countryside. It’s a land that has inspired dreamers and drinkers, revolutionaries and artists, gastronomes and geniuses.

    Geography

    France, the largest country in Western Europe, is bordered to the northwest by the English Channel (La Manche), to the northeast by Belgium and Luxembourg, to the east by Germany, Switzerland and Italy, to the south by the Mediterranean (with Monaco as a coastal enclave between Nice and the Italian frontier), to the southwest by Spain and Andorra, and to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. The country’s loose six-sided shape means it often gets referred to by the informal nickname “L’Hexagone”.

    France is home to an astonishing range of scenery, from the mountain ranges of the Alps and Pyrenees to the attractive river valleys of the Loire, Rhône and Dordogne, and the flatter countryside of Normandy and the Atlantic coast.

    Away from the mainland and Corsica, there are a number of French-administered overseas departments and regions outside of Europe. These include Guadeloupe (an island in the Caribbean), Réunion Island (located in the Indian Ocean just east of Madagascar), French Guiana (on the northeastern coast of South America), Martinique (another island in the Caribbean) and Mayotte (an island in the Mozambique Channel).

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Population: 66,6 millions (2016)

    Capital: Paris.

    Language

    French is the official language. There are many regional dialects, but these are rapidly declining, with the exception of Basque, which is spoken as a first language by some people in the southwest, and Breton, which is spoken by some in Brittany.

    Currency

    Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 cents.

    Electricity

    220 volts AC, 50Hz. Two-pin plugs are widely used.

    Public Holidays

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2018 – December 2019 period.

    Note

    Not all Public Holidays are observed throughout France.

    2018

    Jour de l’An (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2018
    Vendredi Saint (Good Friday): 30 March 2018
    Pâques (Easter Sunday): 1 April 2018
    Lundi de Pâques (Easter Monday): 2 April 2018
    Fête du Travail (Labour Day): 1 May 2018
    Fête de la Victoire (Victory Day 1945): 8 May 2018
    Ascension (Ascension Day): 10 May 2018
    Pentecôte (Whitsunday): 20 May 2018
    Lundi de Pentecôte (Whitmonday): 21 May 2018
    Fête Nationale de la France (Republic Day): 14 July 2018
    Assomption (Assumption Day): 15 August 2018
    Toussaint (All Saints’ Day): 1 November 2018
    Armistice 1918 (Armistice Day 1918):
    11 November 2018
    Noël (Christmas Day): 25 December 2018

    2019

    Jour de l’An (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2019
    Vendredi Saint (Good Friday): 19 April 2019
    Pâques (Easter Sunday): 21 April 2019
    Lundi de Pâques (Easter Monday): 22 April 2019
    Fête du Travail (Labour Day): 1 May 2019
    Fête de la Victoire (Victory Day 1945): 8 May 2019
    Ascension (Ascension Day): 30 May 2019
    Pentecôte (Whitsunday): 9 June 2019
    Lundi de Pentecôte (Whitmonday): 10 June 2019
    Fête Nationale de la France (Republic Day): 14 July 2019
    Assomption (Assumption Day): 15 August 2019
    Toussaint (All Saints’ Day): 1 November 2019
    Armistice 1918 (Armistice Day 1918):
    11 November 2019
    Noël (Christmas Day): 25 December 2019

    All information subject to change.

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    24 hours in Toulouse

    ListMap

    “La ville rose” or “pink city” is the locals’ affectionate nickname for their city – and the ubiquitous rosy-red brick buildings really do bathe it in a pink light. Ironically, this particular feature of urban development was born of necessity since the region had no stone for building, only sandy loam and clay from which red bricks could be fired. Such bricks are still used today in new buildings in an effort to preserve the picturesque general impression.

    The city between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean first flourished thanks to the small pastel plant, which produces an indelible blue dye, and later thanks to the Canal du Midi, which connected it with both the ocean and the sea. Today, the southern French city has opened up to advanced technology so that Toulouse is now an important center of cancer research and also the place where Airbus, the biggest European aircraft maker, has its headquarters.

    8 a.m.: Wake up at Hôtel Le Grand Balcon

    Hôtel Le Grand Balcon
    8-10 Rue Romiguières
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/34 25 44 09
    Double rooms: 150-200 euros
    Breakfast: 18 euros per person.
    Show on map

    Aviation pioneers Jean Mermoz and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry always slept at the guesthouse run by the Marquez sisters, today’s Hôtel Le Grand Balcon, when they spent a night in Toulouse. Almost 100 years later, the hotel that’s just a stone’s throw from Place du Capitole square is still one of the best addresses in town. Completely refurbished in 2008, its new look includes many details that affectionately recall its great aviation history. Large-format cloud wallpapers and time-honored photos from the days of the first aviators complement the rooms’ otherwise contemporary decor. Only room 32, in which Antoine de Saint-Exupéry slept, has been preserved in the style of the period. There, guests enjoy their stay amid the original furniture that once belonged to the famous author and pilot, including a screen, an ornate wrought-iron bedstead and Art Deco clocks on the mantelpiece.

    9 a.m.: Breakfast at the Le Bibent followed by a walking tour of the old town

    Le Bibent
    5 Place du Capitole
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/34 30 18 37
    Show on map
    Les Jacobins
    Rue Lakanal
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-05/61 22 21 92
    Show on map
    St. Sernin
    Place St. Sernin
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    At the Hôtel Le Grand Balcon, the breakfast is “American,” so it’s worth crossing Place du Capitol square for a French-style petit déjeuner. The best place to go for that is Le Bibent, which first opened in 1861. On sunny days, you can sit out on the large terrace of the café and enjoy the best view of the town hall and the two-hectare Place du Capitole, which is a bustling thoroughfare from morning till night. Take cover from the rain inside and you will find yourself enjoying your meal in arguably the loveliest Belle Époque interior in town. The decor is heritage-listed, and Parisian star chef Christian Constant has been presiding over the kitchen here since 2011.

    The café is the ideal starting point for a walking tour of the old town. After taking a brief look at the arcade frescoes artist Raymond Moretti created when the square was renovated in 1997, take the right turn immediately after the Le Bibent into the old town’s maze of narrow streets with their many shops. Rue Gambetta takes you straight to The Jacobins, a Dominican monastery with an impressive Gothic cloister and inner courtyard. From there, head north toward Basilique St. Sernin. Built in 1070 and designated a basilica in 1878, this church is one of the largest Romanesque structures in France (115 meters long and 64 meters wide). It’s also worth paying a visit to the crypt, where you will find not only richly decorated relics but also the remains of the buildings on whose foundation walls this mighty edifice was erected.

    12 noon: Lunch at Marché Victor Hugo market

    Marché Victor Hugo
    Place Victor Hugo
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Want to mingle with the Toulousains on a culinary level? Then head to the Victor Hugo market hall, where five restaurants occupy the full length of the hall’s upper floor and whip up excellent lunches from the produce sold on the floor beneath. One of these is L’Impériale, where three generations of women have been wielding their wooden spoons since 1985: Ginette, Martine and Emma form a culinary trio that pampers their guests’ tastebuds six days a week. They serve home cooking of the very finest: shoulder of beef, the traditional cassoulet stew, pan-fried mussels, grilled fish, salmon carpaccio and a good, honest ham platter. The set meal costs roughly 20 euros; children’s portions are also available. The decor is rustic, the waitstaff are speedy and the mood is cheerful. You should bring along a little patience, though, because there’s a long line as far as the staircase every lunchtime here, and the tables on the covered, azure-blue balcony are in great demand.

    3 p.m.: Stroll along the banks of Canal de Brienne and the Garonne

    Canal de Brienne / L’Ecluse Saint-Pierre
    Allée de Brienne
    31500 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map
    Fondation Bemberg 
Hôtel d'Assézat
    Place d'Assézat
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/61 12 06 89
    Show on map

    Although the Canal de Brienne is a shipping channel just 1.5 kilometers long connecting the Garonne River and the Canal du Midi, nowhere will you find a lovelier place to stroll or cycle by the water. The narrow gravel path beneath the old plane trees is shaded and incredibly romantic. It’s best to set off at the Port de l’Embouchure, where three canals converge, and then walk down as far as the Garonne; an ancient lock marks the end of the canal there. Following Quai St. Pierre and Promenade Henri-Martin, you can walk along the water’s edge back to the city center, Hotel Assézat and the Fondation Bemberg. The townhouse richly ornamented with Doric, Ionian and Corinthian elements is considered the most beautiful in the city. The Renaissance architect Nicolas Bachelier built it for a rich pastel merchant between 1555 and 1557. Pastel, a cruciferous plant also known as “woad,” brought great wealth to Toulouse. When indigo was introduced, resulting in the decline of pastel, the owner of Hôtel Assézat also saw his fortune drastically decline. Today, the heritage-listed building is a museum for art spanning the Renaissance period to the 20th century.

    6 p.m.: Apéro overlooking the Garonne

    Le Café des Artistes
    13 Place de la Daurade
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/61 12 06 00
    Show on map

    Back to the river: The Café des Artistes is the ideal spot for a sundowner. The café, which owes its name to the art school just a short walk away, has no particular decorative style on the inside, but the terrace amply makes up for that, as it gives right onto Quai de la Daurade, the city’s most popular promenade. This is where all of Toulouse, students and retirees alike, gather in the early evening for a quiet chat, and to see and be seen.

    8 p.m.: Cassoulet at Emile’s

    Restaurant Emile
    13 Place St. Georges
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/61 21 05 56
    Show on map

    Ask Toulousains for the best address in town for cassoulet and the answer will always be the same: Emile. Unprepossessing on the outside, this restaurant with a large terrace on busy Place St. Georges square has been around since the 1940s. For the past 20 years, Christophe Fasan has stood at the stove, conjuring up his version of the city’s famous traditional cassoulet, a hearty stew of white beans, meat and sausages. It takes three quarters of an hour for the cassoulet with its golden-yellow crust to be ready and brought to the table in its typical regional earthenware pot. Fasan doesn’t just cook cassoulet; as a member of the Académie Universelle de Cassoulet, where fans of the dish come together, he is also committed to preserving this traditional dish. But cassoulet is not the only meal this likeable restaurant owner can prepare: his fish dishes are also well worth a recommendation.

    Midnight: Dance the night away at the Ubu Club

    The Ubu Club 

    16 Rue Sainte-Rome
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Tel.: +33-5/61 23 26 75
    Show on map

    This club is a veritable legend in Toulouse. A long, very narrow passageway has led to the black door with its little peephole since 1959. Behind it, the doorman decides who may enter and who may not. The Ubu Club has all it takes to be iconic: It opens when all the rest are closing and stays open till 7 in the morning. Down in the basement of the famous brick building, there’s a confusion of different dance floors, and everything is bathed in red light. The house specialty is a drink called “Les Filles adorent” (The girls love it), a mix of blended strawberries, vodka and vanilla cream. The atmosphere and the music are very 1970s and 1980s.

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    Gourmet land of plenty

    The halls of the Marché Victor Hugo, which were extensively renovated in 2017, (marche-victor-hugo.fr) look highly functional from the outside, but it’s still definitely worth a visit because the roughly 100 market stalls inside are a veritable paradise for gourmets. This is the place to pick up specialties like porc noir de Bigorre ham, truffles and snails. But above all, it’s where you can experience the pleasure people take in creating fantastic taste experiences from natural products. To sample typical southern French dishes, like cassoulet, for example, visit one of the five market restaurants, which naturally source the produce they use from the market vendors.

    Marché Victor Hugo
    Place Victor Hugo

    31000 Toulouse
    France

    Open:
    Tuesday to Sunday: 06:00–14:00

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    Restaurants in Toulouse

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    You can’t come to Toulouse and not try its famous meat and bean stew: the cassoulet.

    Other specialities include Roquefort cheese, plus the violet flower, used in confectionary and desserts.

    Restaurant Michel Sarran

    21 Boulevard Armand Duportal
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Price: Luxurious

    One of the city’s best restaurants, you’ll taste superior French cooking here in a homely atmosphere.

    Les Jardins de l’Opera

    1 Place du Capitole
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Price: Luxurious

    A Florentine courtyard off Toulouse’s main square houses this modern fine dining restaurant.

    Le Colombier

    14 Rue Bayard
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    This is one of the best places in town to try cassoulet, as it’s been serving it up for over 150 years.

    Restaurant Emile

    13 Place Saint-Georges
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    The flavours of southwest France served with a contemporary twist.

    Le Grenier de Pépé

    1 Rue Denfert Rochereau
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Price: Budget

    Ideal for a quick and tasty lunch, this small place serves sweet and savoury crêpes, salads and fondue.

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    Hotels in Toulouse

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    Toulouse is well endowed with overnight accommodation, and it’s generally reasonably priced.

    From bed and breakfasts to boutique hotels to luxury pads, there’s plenty to go around.

    Grand Hôtel de l’Opéra

    1 Place du Capitole
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Category: Luxurious

    Right on Capitole square, this elegant hotel combines traditional décor with modern luxury – including a spa.

    Hôtel des Beaux-Arts

    1 Place du Pont Neuf
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    This beautifully styled 4-star hotel overlooks the river Garonne.

    Le Père Leon

    2 Place Esquirol
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A family-run boutique hotel with a lovely brasserie run by a Michelin-starred chef.

    Hôtel Design Les Bains Douches

    4 & 4 bis, Rue du Pont Guilheméry
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A stylish design hotel located in an art deco building near Toulouse Cathedral.

    Le Clocher de Rodez

    14 Place Jeanne d’Arc
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Category: Budget

    This comfortable 3-star in the city centre is housed in an 18th-century former post-house.

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    Nightlife in Toulouse

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    Toulouse’s large student population ensures a thriving bar and club scene.

    From riverside cafés to all-night dancing, you’re never too far from a watering hole.

    Au Père Louis

    45 rue des Tourneurs
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    Start your night with an aperitif at this Toulouse institution, founded in 1889.

    N°5 Wine Bar

    5 rue de la Bourse

    31000 Toulouse

    France
    Show on map

    Wine bar owners and wine lovers Anne and Thomas Cabrol are only too happy to share their love of wine with their patrons. They stock a wide selection of first-rate wines and offer their guests friendly, expert advice. Make sure to book in advance for the tasting menu (which includes five wines).

    Ma Biche sur le toit

    4-8 rue du Lieutenant Colonel Pelissier
    31000 Toulouse
    
France
    Show on map

    In the rooftop bar of department store Galeries Lafayette, you can eat and drink while enjoying a magnificent view all the way through from breakfast (starting 09:30 a.m.) to nightcap time (02:00 a.m.). The city looks particularly beautiful at dusk, when it glows the typical rose pink that earned it its byname.

    La Couleur de la Culotte

    14 place Saint-Pierre
    31000 Toulouse
    France
    Show on map

    This cocktail bar and brasserie ramps up in the evening with live music and DJ nights.

    Théâtre Garonne

    1, avenue du Château d'eau

    31000 Toulouse

    France
    Show on map

    This major European theater is housed in a former pumping station. The program consists mainly of modern and contemporary plays but also includes dance theater and concerts – so it’s worth paying a visit even if you don’t understand French. For the full program details and to book online, visit the theater’s website (theartegaronne.com).

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    Calendar of events

    Fête de la Violette

    March 2019

    Venue: Place du Capitole

    Once upon a time, these purple flowers formed a main part of the local economy. Now you can only find them in a few specialist places, often in the form of sweets or bath salts. Every year, Toulouse celebrates its emblematic flower with this festival as a chance to relive the past and to preserve the skills of another age.

    Rio Loco

    14 – 17 June 2018
    Website

    Venue: Prairie des Filtres

    Rio Loco, which translates as ‘Crazy River’, invites a foreign city to mingle on the banks of the River Garonne each year. Expect a month of outdoor music, a carnival atmosphere, food tastings and relaxed, continental drinking in the midst of this cultural exchange.

    Les Siestes Electroniques

    27 June – 1 July 2018
    Website

    Venue: Jardin Compans-Caffarelli

    This annual event in Toulouse celebrates, in its own words, ‘sweet and restful’ music. It’s a series of club evenings and outdoor concerts that feature contemporary music from around the globe. Lie back on the riverbank, close your eyes, listen and relax.

    Toulouse d’Été

    July – August 2018
    Website

    Venue: Throughout Toulouse

    Toulouse d’Été is the Pink City’s summer festival and it involves weeks of lounging by the river as jazz, rock, electronic music, waltz and tango fill the air. Several concerts also take place within Toulouse’s magnificent historic buildings, providing a relaxing way to appreciate the city’s past.

    Piano aux Jacobins

    September 2018
    Website

    Venue: Eglise St Jacobins

    Set within Toulouse’s St Jacobins Church, with its stunningly tall pillars and other-worldly feel, this annual festival draws some of the best pianists in the world.

    Le Printemps de Septembre

    September – October 2018
    Website

    Venue: Throughout Toulouse

    Toulouse’s Printemps de Septembre is a three-week-long art festival extravaganza that manages to jam in sculpture, painting, video, photography, cinema and music to boot. Events take place in some dazzling venues across the city, making it a great way to explore Toulouse.

    Festival Occitània

    8 September – 25 October 2018
    Website

    Venue: Throughout Toulouse

    Toulouse is situated at the heart of the region of Occitania, which accounts for roughly the southern third of present-day France. In the Middle Ages, Occitania was united by a common language and culture. Since the 1950s, old traditions have been revived there and since 2000, this festival in Toulouse has celebrated the old songs and dances.

    Le Marché de Noël

    November – December 2018
    Website

    Venue: Place du Capitole

    Surrounded by the pink-brick facades of Place du Capitole, the Christmas Market comes complete with an ice rink, spiced wine, dripping fairy lights and homemade crafts. Toulouse then adds its own touch to the proceedings with local cheese and wine.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

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    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone
    Country code: +33

    Mobile telephony and Internet
    Since June 2017, EU citizens traveling within the EU, and also in Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein have been able to use their cell phones and surf the Net without incurring any extra charges: In other words, customers pay the same price for phone calls, text messages and data volume as they do at home. Restrictions do apply to the constant use of SIM cards abroad, however, and caps may be set on data packages. For full details, contact your mobile telephony provider in your country. Travelers using a SIM card from a non-EU state do not benefit from the new arrangement.

    Free Internet access via Wi-Fi is possible in many busy tourist spots. When using public Wi-Fi networks, it is a wise precaution to ensure encryption of all passwords, credit card details and banking credentials entered. Use of a VPN app or security software to check the safety of a hotspot is recommended.

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    Shopping in Toulouse

    Key Areas

    Compact and widely pedestrianised, Toulouse is well set up for shoppers. Find all the usual French and international chains on and around Rue d’Alsace-Lorraine and Rue Saint-Rome. Upmarket designer boutiques are gathered on Rue des Arts, Place Saint-Georges and further north on Place Victor-Hugo, including Toulouse-born brand Le Comptoir des Cotonniers (17 rue des Arts). At the other end of the scale, hunt out vintage and second-hand clothes at Place de la Bourse.

    Markets

    Toulouse has numerous good markets. On Sundays, visit the St Sernin market and rummage through antiques, bric-a-brac and second-hand clothes, while on Place du Capitole find a huge flea market every Wednesday. An essential Toulouse experience is a trip to the Marché Victor Hugo (Place Victor Hugo): a vast covered food market dishing up regional specialities.

    Shopping Centres

    French department store Galeries Lafayette has a branch in Toulouse (4-8 rue Lapeyrouse). For 50 shops under one roof, head to centrally located shopping centre Espace Saint-Georges.

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    Best time to visit

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    overcast

    temperature


    14°C


    wind direction

    north

    wind speed

    1.25 mph

    humidity

    0%

    7 days forecast

    Monday

    22.10.2018

    16°C / 12°C

    Tuesday

    23.10.2018

    17°C / 9°C

    Wednesday

    24.10.2018

    18°C / 9°C

    Thursday

    25.10.2018

    18°C / 10°C

    Friday

    26.10.2018

    17°C / 10°C

    Saturday

    27.10.2018

    14°C / 11°C

    Sunday

    28.10.2018

    9°C / 4°C

    Climate & best time to visit France

    France has a temperate climate in the north; northeastern areas have a more continental climate with warm summers and colder winters. Rainfall is distributed throughout the year with some snow likely in winter. The Jura Mountains have an alpine climate. Lorraine, sheltered by bordering hills, has a relatively mild climate. There’s a Mediterranean climate in the south; mountainous areas are cooler with heavy snow in winter.

    The Atlantic influences the climate of the western coastal areas from the Loire to the Basque region where the weather is temperate and relatively mild with rainfall throughout the year. Summers can be very hot and sunny – sunburn can be a risk if you’re unprepared. Inland areas are mild and the French slopes of the Pyrenees are renowned for their sunshine record. A Mediterranean climate exists on the Riviera, and in Provence and Roussillon. Weather in the French Alps is variable. Continental weather is present in Auvergne, Burgundy and the Rhône Valley. Very strong winds (such as the Mistral) can occur throughout the entire region.

    Climatic variations – and in particular the long summer holiday period – mean that mainstream tourism in France peaks in July and August. If you’re visiting the country at this time, prepare to face higher-than-usual demand at major sights, attractions and coastal resorts. There’s likely to be plenty of queuing involved – some roads may even get clogged at particularly busy times.

    By contrast, visiting during the low season – from October through to February or March – is not only far quieter, it also sees a drop in costs. This doesn’t apply to ski resorts, of course, which see peak demand over the winter months.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    21 °C

    -18 °C

    22 °C

    -19 °C

    27 °C

    -8 °C

    30 °C

    -3 °C

    32 °C

    0 °C

    39 °C

    4 °C

    40 °C

    7 °C

    40 °C

    5 °C

    35 °C

    1 °C

    30 °C

    -3 °C

    24 °C

    -7 °C

    21 °C

    -12 °C

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    55 mm

    55 mm

    58 mm

    64 mm

    73 mm

    58 mm

    41 mm

    47 mm

    48 mm

    52 mm

    49 mm

    56 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    2 h

    3 h

    5 h

    5 h

    6 h

    7 h

    8 h

    7 h

    7 h

    5 h

    3 h

    2 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    89 %

    82 %

    77 %

    75 %

    75 %

    72 %

    70 %

    70 %

    77 %

    83 %

    87 %

    90 %

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ precipitationdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan21 °C-18 °C9 °C1 °C89 %55 mm102.9 h
    Feb22 °C-19 °C10 °C2 °C82 %55 mm93.9 h
    Mar27 °C-8 °C13 °C4 °C77 %58 mm115.3 h
    Apr30 °C-3 °C16 °C6 °C75 %64 mm115.9 h
    May32 °C0 °C20 °C9 °C75 %73 mm106.8 h
    Jun39 °C4 °C23 °C12 °C72 %58 mm87.8 h
    Jul40 °C7 °C27 °C15 °C70 %41 mm58.9 h
    Aug40 °C5 °C26 °C15 °C70 %47 mm67.8 h
    Sep35 °C1 °C24 °C12 °C77 %48 mm77.0 h
    Oct30 °C-3 °C19 °C9 °C83 %52 mm75.2 h
    Nov24 °C-7 °C12 °C5 °C87 %49 mm93.4 h
    Dec21 °C-12 °C9 °C2 °C90 %56 mm92.5 h
    year40 °C-19 °C17 °C8 °C79 %656 mm1025.6 h

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

    IATA Travel CentreIATA Travel Centre

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    Shaking hands and, more familiarly, kissing both cheeks, are the usual forms of greeting. The form of personal address is simply Monsieur or Madame without a surname and it may take time to get on first-name terms. At more formal dinners, it is the most important guest or host who gives the signal to start eating. Mealtimes are often a long, leisurely experience. Casual wear is common.

    Social functions, some clubs, casinos and exclusive restaurants warrant more formal attire. Evening wear is normally specified where required. Topless sunbathing is tolerated on most beaches but naturism is restricted to certain beaches – local tourist offices will advise where these are. A smoking ban for workplaces and public spaces has been in place since February 2007.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Food & Drink

    This being France, the only real problems posed by the local food and drink are mild stomach complaints resulting from overindulgence. Tap water is safe to drink (although you’ll find a huge amount of bottled water for sale too) and cooked food, assuming it’s come from a hygienic kitchen, is certainly no more risky to consume than that of any developed country. Some travellers steer clear of unpasteurised dairy products due to a perceived risk of disease, while others laud the same products for their perceived health benefits. If you’re at all unsure, it’s probably best to stick to what you’re used to.

    Other Risks

    Visitors to forested areas should consider vaccination for tick-borne encephalitis. There was an outbreak of canine rabies in 2008. For those at high risk, vaccination before arrival should be considered. If you are bitten, seek medical advice without delay.

    In more universal terms, sunburn is perhaps the most common complaint among visitors to France, particularly over the summer months – temperatures are generally higher in the south but it’s wise to be cautious across the country. The usual precautions apply: use a generous amount of sunscreen and be sensible about how long you spend in direct sunlight. Be aware that a breezy day can sometimes mask high temperatures.

    If walking over a long distance in warm weather, it’s advisable to drink – and carry – plenty of water and wear appropriate clothing, including a sun hat. Blisters can be another problem for hikers. These can often occur if new walking shoes are being worn across a long distance. Ideally footwear should be worn in before the trip.

    Flight and accommodation