United Kingdom
Login

Unable to login to the Travel Guide. Please go to our homepage to login.

Homepage
Sort by category
  • Good to know
  • Discover
  • Enjoy
  • Offers

City map

Quick view

Finnland, Helsinki, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Best price search

from
London - Helsinki,
Round-trip flight, 7 days
from
London - HEL,
Round-trip flight, 7 days

24 hours in ...
... Torkkelinmäki

Lufthansa, Travelguide, Helsinki,church of Kallio in Helsinki.Finnland.

Top 10 sights

Nationalmuseum Finnland, Helsinki, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide

Finland
General knowledge

Finnland, Helsinki, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Airport Information

Flughafen, Airport, kontinental, Flotte, Lufthansa, Stadtführer

Getting around Helsinki

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, vor Ort unterwegs

Nightlife

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Nachtleben, Nightlife

Restaurants

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Restaurants

Calendar of events

Hotels

We recommend, you book at

Weather & best time to visit

15°
Tuesday, 27.06.2017
09:00 UTC

Phone calls & Internet

Telefonieren & Internet, Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Shopping in Helsinki

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

Find rental car

Travel etiquette
How to fit in

Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Reise-Etikette, verhalten, Benehmen

Health

Gesundheit, Vorsorge, Risiken vorbeugen, Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide

Visa & Immigration

Good to know

City map Helsinki

Points of interest: Your selected categories
    Show all
    Good to know

    Helsinki: Design, foodie delights and green areas galore

    Tucked away at the end of the Gulf of Finland, Helsinki is a seaside city with a long history and an even longer list of things to do. Like Copenhagen and Stockholm, art and architecture feature heavily, as does design, while its foodie scene – long regarded as a Baltic version of British cuisine – is improving rapidly.

    Freezing in winter and balmy in summer, Helsinki’s many museums make it a year-round destination, although if you want to take advantage of its many alfresco beauties, June and July are best.

    Flight and accommodation

    Offers
    Discover

    24 hours in Torkkelinmäki, Helsinki

    ListMap

    The best way to explore a city is on foot. In Helsinki, that’s easy to do as the Finnish capital is not very big, but it does have a number of trendy neighborhoods. On everyone’s lips right now is Torkkelinmäki, an area of the former working-class district Kallio.

    It has a reputation for being liberal, unconventional and historically left wing – it’s where most trade unions used to have their headquarters. Pitkäsilta Bridge separates Torkkelinmäki from downtown Helsinki. When political camps agree in Finland, they are still sometimes described as having “crossed the Pitkäsilta.” Torkkelinmäki is also home to Helsinki’s red-light district.

    09:00 a.m.: Wake up at the Uman Hotel

    Fleminginkatu 8 C 70
    00530 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-44/987 93 20
    Show on map

    Despite the name, this is way more AirBnB than hotel – soft beds, small rooms with an integrated kitchen complete with bread-baking machine. Furnishings and design are of minimalist Scandinavian/purist persuasion, the color scheme muted. If you’ve ever been to IKEA, you’ll soon find your way around. Your balcony or terrace is the best place to enjoy the coffee you made on arrival because from there, you can also see the lay of the land. Everything in this neighborhood is designed for practicality: The buildings and apartments tend to be on the small side and entirely devoid of extravagant flourishes. On the way to breakfast, you pass by examples of typical architecture, such as Kallio Church on a hill two blocks away, which towers above everything else and is therefore visible from the hotel. Built in 1912, it was reputedly designed to emulate Solomon’s temple.

    10:00 a.m.: Breakfast at the Rupla

    Helsinginkatu 16
    00500 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-50/468 43 34
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 1100-1800
    Sat-Sun 1100-1700

    Feel free to dawdle or your walk to breakfast won’t last very long: It’s just 230 meters from the hotel to the Rupla. Yellowing sign on the doorstep, worn front door, and old wooden tables – all is exactly as it should be, since this place combines art with food. It serves up changing exhibitions along with sandwiches and good coffee. Lunch comes at a very reasonable price, tastes goods and is made from ingredients that would otherwise be thrown away. Single-speed bicycles are parked outside the door, while inside, the café is filled with bearded men and women who work as models: The Rupla is supposedly the hippest place in all of Helsinki. Second-hand clothes (mainly from the 1970s) are sold in back, and if you take a particular fancy to your chair while munching on carrot cake, you are welcome to take it with you because all of the furniture is also for sale. Hence the Rupla’s regularly changing decor.

    11:00 a.m.: Buy a gift at Wahna Kaarle

    Kaarlenkatu 12 B
    00530 Helsinki

    Finland
    Tel. +358-50/598 10 84
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 1200-1800
    Sun closed

    Only a few hundred meters further off, but this time in the other direction: It’s time to spare a thought for loved ones at home and buy them a gift. How about some impaled butterflies under glass from a Finnish industrialist’s collection? If so, then Wanha Kaarle is the place to head for. It is crammed with all manner of stuff: pots and pans, lamps, china ducks and plastic fruit, newspaper stands and tea cups, wooden train sets and dolls. This shop is so small that it even uses the street as a storeroom in good weather. Much of what is sold here is impractical, but few articles are truly ugly. In fact, the same premise can be applied here: Scandinavians and design simply go well together. And anyone needing a dress to match their newly acquired plastic dog can take a quick look next door, where Frida Marina stocks every possible style of clothing from the 1950s to the 1980s, most articles are very well preserved and many of them of Finnish design. Coffee is also served here – organic, naturally.

    12:30 p.m.: Grab a shave at The Barber Shop

    Fredrikinkatu 19
    00120 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-40/159 11 97
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0930-1930
    Sat and Sun closed

    We exit Torkkelinmäki briefly in the interests of looking good for our evenings’ activities and in search of The Barber Shop. It is also located in a hipster area, Punavuori, the coolest place in town before Torkkelinmäki became the coolest place. This doesn’t worry owner Rody Maher, a Brit, who’s been in business here for the past 25 years. He trims beards by appointment and old English custom, which more or less means that everything here is rather conservative and/or has a very Victorian feel to it.

    02:00 p.m.: Enjoy the sun in Karhupuisto Park

    Fleminginkatu
    00530 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Back to Torkkelinmäki. See and be seen. This park with a bear monument at its center is a popular meeting place for young and old alike, especially in the summer. Because more and more LGBT events are being held here, it has also been the focal point of gay life in the Finnish capital for years. There are plenty of bars and restaurants close by, but the simply named Bear Park Café is the most popular. The flowers in the middle of the park were planted in the late 1990s with the idea of driving the drunks away with the beauty of the plants and the bustle of the volunteer gardeners, who today number more than 100 today. The plan was not entirely successful, and a lot of drinking still goes on here on weekends. Style-conscious visitors always bring an intellectual magazine along to the park.

    03:00 p.m.: Sweet treats at Cafe Cardemumma

    Kaarlenkatu 15

    00510 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-45/355 81 50
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0730-1700
    Sat 1000-1500
    Sun closed

    Been a while since your last cup of coffee? Quick, head to the Cardemumma. The wait staff may blow hot and cold like the wind on the Baltic, but the cinnamon buns here are the best in town. They are gigantic, served warm and by Finnish standards almost given away. And there’s no need for the more health-conscious to steer clear of the place, either, because the menu also includes salad and changing daily specials. These are not the main focus, however, which is on sweet treats: In addition to the cinnamon buns, there’s a vast array of cakes, biscuits and various sweet rolls. You’ll likely find yourself spotting your first familiar faces again here because Rupla and Wahne Kaarle are not far off. In the summer, this really small café simply spills out onto the street. You’ll see hipsters sitting alongside people who have been living in the neighborhood for decades here.

    04:30 p.m.: Sweat at Kotiharjun Sauna Oy

    Harjutorinkatu 1
    00500 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-9/753 15 35
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 1400-2000
    Mon closed

    Admission 13 Euros

    If you want see nice, friendly Finns getting into a heated debate, just tell them it was the Russians who invented the sauna. Suddenly, the people all around you will become extremely communicative. Part of the evidence they cite to prove that the Finns can outdo their eastern neighbors where the sauna is concerned is the year, 1929, in which this particular sauna was built and opened. Not only is it the oldest in the city, but it is entirely in concrete, too, so the stone on which you sit is really hot. Towels are nevertheless frowned upon and even the small wooden seat planks are used only by crybabies. The only wood in the hot room is birch, which is burned to heat the place up to 100 degrees Celsius. Infusions here are also more on the rustic side – if you want to heat things up a little, you just pour water onto the embers around the stove (and then quickly turn away to avoid the rising ash). To cool off, you step outside the door onto the street – just two meters away from passersby lugging shopping bags or taking their dogs for a walk or their kids to the bus. Obligatory: a beer at the end of each session in the hot room. Gin and vodka mixers are also available here, but they count as non-alcoholic.

    08:00 p.m.: Line your stomach at the Naughty Burger

    Lönnrotinkatu 13
    00120 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-40/516 40 40
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sat 1100-2200
    Sun 1200-1900
    Mon closed

    We make another quick detour to hipster neighborhood Punavuori. That’s easy because in Helsinki (almost) everywhere is within walking distance. And the good reason to go there now is the Naughty Burger, which supposedly serves the best burgers in Helsinki. Evil tongues might say that’s hardly a feat; Helsinki is, after all, the capital of fast food chain Hesburger, which certainly doesn’t employ such magnificently tattooed wait staff. And where else can you listen to heavy metal from Biohazard or Anthrax while you wait for your fries? Still, you will see plenty of young moms with small children here.

    09:00 p.m.: Enjoy a drink at the Pulmu

    Fleminginkatu 13
    00500 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-40/559 36 17
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 1800-0200

    Everyone can be a DJ here and include their own songs on the playlist, but the music still isn’t terrible, which speaks for the guests. The Pulmu is also proud of a long drink that was created especially for the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki and which it serves in practical, large tumblers. The interior decor is reminiscent of a travel agency of the legendary American airline Pan Am in the 1950s: everything here is generally reminiscent of aviation and specifically of the legendary US airline. As the Pulmu is small, the atmosphere is quite intimate, making it another place to discover how very communicative the Finns are. Any claims to the contrary are plain wrong!

    11:00 p.m.: Dance at the Kaiku

    Kaikukatu 4
    00530 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +358-45/111 14 66
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Wed-Sun 2200-0400

    According to the Guardian, the Kaiku is one of Europe’s top nightclubs. In Helsinki, it’s described as “Berlin-style.” Be that as it may, it is certainly one of the few clubs in town to have bouncers on the door. It occupies a former industrial building that housed a match factory that also produced metal clips for spring mattresses, as well as an industrial bakery. The operators of the Kaiku took the old division of space as the basis for their concept for a club with different floors. Electro is the dominant music genre here, but the intensity varies. International and Finnish DJs alternate, the sound booming from the speakers is superb, and when exhaustion sets in, dancers can step out onto the balcony or terrace for a breath of fresh air. It’s the perfect place to spot trendsetting Finns in golden jackets and swim caps. Worth remembering: On weekends, there’s a very long line outside the door.

    Flight and accommodation

    Discover

    Top 10 sights in Helsinki

    ListMap
    Helsinki, Finnland, Skandinavien, Lufthansa, Travel Guide, Travelguide,Suomenlinna fortress

    Suomenlinna

    Suomenlinna C 74
    00190 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (029) 533 8410
    Show on map

    Once the greatest sea fortress on the Baltic, Suomenlinna occupies an entire island and was built by the Swedes in the mid-1700s and, along with the historic castle, now houses theatres, bars and restaurants.

    Helsinki Cathedral

    Unioninkatu 29
    00170 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (09) 2340 6120
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0900-0000 (Jun-Aug)
    0900-1800 (Sep-May)

    Designed by Carl Ludwig Engel, the magnificent 19th-century Helsinki Cathedral looks more like a Greek temple than a church but is utterly spectacular within.

    Linnanmäki Amusement Park

    Tivolikuja 1
    00510 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (010) 572 2200
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Late April to late October (times vary; check website for details)

    More than half a century old, the Linnanmäki Amusement Park is a charming old funfair complete with traditional rides and a wooden roller coaster that’s as old as the park.

    National Museum of Finland

    Mannerheimintie 34
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (040) 128 6469
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue-Sun 1100-1800

    More than 170 years old, the National Museum of Finland charts Finnish history from prehistory to present day via a series of often eye-opening exhibits.

    Temppeliaukio

    Lutherinkatu 3
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (09) 2340 6320
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Sat 1000-1745
    Sun 1145-1745 (Jun-Aug)
    Mon-Sat 1000-1700
    Sun 1145-1700 (Sep-May)

    Hewn out of solid bedrock, the Temppeliaukio (rock church) opened in 1969 and has been wowing tourists and locals alike ever since. Designed by architects Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen, it doubles as a concert venue.

    Sibelius Monument

    Sibeliuksen puisto
    00250 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Unveiled in 1967, the vast Silbelius Monument commemorates composer Jean Sibelius and was designed to resemble a set of organ pipes by architect Eila Hiltunen.

    Helsinki Zoo

    Mustikkamaanpolku 12
    00570 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (09) 3103 7901
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 1000-1600 (Oct-Mar)
    1000-1800 (Apr and Sep)
    1000-2000 (May-Aug)

    One of the oldest zoos on the planet, Helsinki Zoo opened in 1889 and is home to more than 1,000 different species of plant and 200 different types of animal.

    Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art

    Mannerheiminaukio 2
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (0294) 500 501
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tue and Sun 1000-1700
    Wed-Fri 1000-2030
    Sat 1000-1800

    With a focus on art created from the mid-1960s onwards, the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art has pieces by all the modern masters as well as an on-site theatre specialising in experimental dance.

    Olympic Stadium

    Paavo Nurmen tie 1
    00250 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (09) 436 6010
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0800-2000
    Sat-Sun 0900-1800

    Completed in 1938 and used as the centrepiece for the 1952 Olympic Games, Helsinki’s Olympic Stadium remains one of the Finnish capital’s main sport and music venues. It also boasts a museum and a 72m (236ft) tower, complete with a viewing platform at the top.

    Eduskunta

    Mannerheimintie 30
    00102 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel: (09) 432 2027
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Mon-Fri 0900-1615 (guided tours)

    Helsinki’s Parliament building might not be the prettiest but it is impressively large and contains a number of interesting exhibits as well as its very own café.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Country Information

    Country overview

    Finland is the big surprise of the Nordic countries, a natural wonderland with more trees than people and more islands than any other nation in the world. With endless miles of wilderness and 188,000 lakes on their doorstep, the Finns are uniquely in tune with their surroundings.

    Even committed urbanites retreat to wooden cottages in the country during the brief warm summers to swim and fish in the lakes and gather wild berries and mushrooms in the woods, before unwinding with a sauna and a glass of kossu (Finnish vodka).

    Geography

    The history and politics of Finland has been shaped by its location, wedged between Sweden to the west, Norway to the north and Russia to the east. The national character of the Finns has been further coloured by the water-logged landscape – the country is hemmed in by the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland and 10% of its landmass lies underwater. Finland has more islands than any other country on earth – 30,000 off the Finnish coast and a further 98,000 islands in its 188,000 inland lakes – and the Saimaa Lake system in the southeast of the country is the largest inland water system in Europe.

    By European standards, Finland is very sparsely populated.

    Around 69% of the country is covered by the pine forests that define the northern coniferous zone. In the south and southwest, the forest is mainly pine, fir and birch; in Lapland, in the far north, scattered dwarf birch forests give way to Arctic tundra. Most of the national forests are managed for timber, which is used for the manufacture of furniture, paper and fibreboards and for domestic heating and warming Finland’s 1.6 million saunas. Finland’s forests are said to be the most sustainably managed in Europe. Only 8% of the land is used for agriculture – more than 50% of Finns work in manufacturing or the service sector.

    General knowledge

    Facts

    Population: 5266114

    Population Density (per sq km): 16

    Capital: Helsinki.

    Language

    There are two official languages: Finnish, mother tongue for 91.6% of the population, and Swedish, first language of 5.5% of the population. Swedish Finns have a distinct cultural identity and often speak English more fluently than they speak Finnish. The Finnish language is related to only Estonian and Hungarian. Around 2,000 people in Lapland speak one of the dialects of the Sámi language, while Karelian dialects still survive amongst older people in the east of the country. English is taught as the first foreign language.

    Currency

    Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10 and 5 cents. Note that 1 and 2 cent coins, while valid in other eurozone countries, are not used in Finland.

    Electricity

    230 volts AC, 50Hz. European two-pin plugs are standard.

    General business opening hours

    Mon-Fri 0800-1615, though some places stay open till 1700.

    Country information

    Below are listed Public Holidays for the January 2017 – December 2018 period.

    2017

    Uudenvuodenpäivä (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2017
    Loppiainen (Epiphanias): 6 January 2017
    Pitkäperjantai (Good Friday): 14 April 2017
    Pääsiäispäivä (Easter Sunday): 16 April 2017
    2. Pääsiäispäivä (Easter Monday): 17 April 2017
    Vappu (May Day): 1 May 2017
    Helatorstai (Ascension Day): 25 May 2017
    Helluntai (Whitsunday): 4 June 2017
    Juhannuspäivä (Midsummer): 24 June 2017
    Pyhäinpäivä (All Saints’ Day): 4 November 2017
    Itsenäisyyspäivä (National Day, Independence Day): 6 December 2017
    Joulupäivä (Christmas): 25 December 2017
    Tapaninpäivä (St. Stephen’s Day): 26 December 2017

    2018

    Uudenvuodenpäivä (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2018
    Loppiainen (Epiphanias): 6 January 2018
    Pitkäperjantai (Good Friday): 30 March 2018
    Pääsiäispäivä (Easter Sunday): 1 April 2018
    2. Pääsiäispäivä (Easter Monday): 2 April 2018
    Vappu (May Day): 1 May 2018
    Helatorstai (Ascension Day): 10 May 2018
    Helluntai (Whitsunday): 20 May 2018
    Juhannuspäivä (Midsummer): 23 June 2018
    Pyhäinpäivä (All Saints’ Day): 3 November 2018
    Itsenäisyyspäivä (National Day, Independence Day): 6 December 2018
    Joulupäivä (Christmas): 25 December 2018
    Tapaninpäivä (St. Stephen’s Day): 26 December 2018

    All information subject to change.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Getting around

    Public Transport:
    Helsinki has a comprehensive integrated transport system, with trams, buses and metro all included on the same ticket, although it is possible to buy tram-only tickets if you prefer. All tickets have to be bought from ticket machines – while you can pick up tickets on some forms of transport, tram drivers will not sell you anything. Choose from single, which for €2.50 will give you unlimited travel within Helsinki for an hour, regional which includes Espoo, Vantaa and Kauniainen, and day. Alternatively, there’s the Travel Card, a reloadable smart card that lets you pay on a pay-as-you-go basis and is available from all the main stations.

    Taxis:
    Cabs are easy to pick up and fares are regulated by the government, so are never uncomfortably high. Hailing a cab will cost you €5 (€9 after 9pm) and the meter ticks over at €1.52 per kilometre.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Nightlife in Helsinki

    ListMap

    Despite their morose reputation, Finns love a party and as a result, Helsinki’s bars are packed come weekends and Wednesdays.

    There’s no shortage of choice either, although the death metal and Viking metal bars are probably best avoided.

    Ateljee Bar

    Yrjönkatu 26
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Incredible views thanks to its location on the 14th floor of the Sokos Hotel.

    Café Cavalier

    Malminrinne 2-4
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    A super-chic gay bar in central Helsinki. Live music and great cocktails.

    CUBA!

    Erottajankatu 4
    00120 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Caribbean-themed fun and excellent mojitos.

    Bar Bäkkäri

    Pohjoinen Rautatiekatu 21
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    A popular rock ‘n’ roll themed bar that thankfully eschews death metal.

    Tavastiaklubi

    Urho Kekkosen katu 4-6
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    A Helsinki institution, Tavasiaklubi is ridiculously popular with the style set.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Helsinki

    ListMap

    Finland isn’t known for its food although, as in the UK, that is starting to change. As befits a sea port, Helsinki’s restaurants

    are excellent for seafood as well as local delicacies such as cold smoked herring and delicate semi salty Åland Islands lamb.

    A21 Dining

    Kalevankatu 17
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Dishes are themed by the part of Finland they come from and everything is fresh and organic.

    Restaurant Nokka

    Kanavaranta 7F
    00160 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Voted Helsinki’s best restaurant four years in a row, Nokka is the place for gourmet Finnish fare.

    G.W. Sundmans

    Eteläranta 16
    00130 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    The grand dame of Helsinki restaurants, G.W Sundmans serves Finnish classics with a twist.

    Bryggeri Helsinki

    Sofiankatu 2
    00170 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    Good beer and new Nordic food of the sort more often found in Copenhagen.

    Sea Horse

    Kapteeninkatu 11
    00140 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    A taste of Finnish home cooking for those on a budget.

    Flight and accommodation

    Discover

    Calendar of events

    Restaurant Day

    February 2017
    Website

    Venue: Participating Restaurants

    The city celebrates its dynamic food scene with Restaurant Day, taking place four times a year, in which pop up restaurants open in parks, courtyards and on street corners, to showcase the best culinary gems of Helsinki.

    World Village Festival

    27 – 28 May 2017
    Website

    Venue: Kaisaniemi Park and Railway Square

    Cultures from all over the world meet annually during this Festival in Helsinki. There is a lot happening from music, circus, dance, theatre, art to various fun filled activities. The Festival also offers new perspectives on tolerant multiculturalism and global issues.

    Helsinki Pride

    June – July 2017
    Website

    Venue: Kaivopuisto Park

    Each summer, Helsinki’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community party and get political at Finland’s biggest Pride festival. The annual event promotes equality and openness through discussions, cultural events, parties and a big parade. Thousands march through the streets in an eye-popping and colourful display, and over 10,000 revellers take part in the wider events. Performers and activists rub up alongside spectators and organisers, but the event is not only popular with the LGBT community. It’s also a great excuse for the rest of the city to enjoy themselves whilst showing solidarity for a good cause.

    Helsinki Festival

    17 August – 3 September 2017
    Website

    Venue: Varous Venues

    The Helsinki Festival is the largest multi-arts festival in Finland, lasting two weeks, and featuring everything from classical music to pop and world music, from theatre to contemporary dance, and from the visual arts to cinema and children’s events. Related events include art-themed urban culture, as well as Night of the Arts.

    Helsinki International Film Festival

    September 2017
    Website

    Venue: Various cinemas in Helsinki

    The annual Helsinki International Film Festival offers a great mix of screenings which attracts well over 40,000 film buffs each year to screens throughout the Finnish capital. Filmmakers from all over the world attend the event where visitors can enjoy a mix of shorts, features, documentaries and animations by well-known film-makers and fresh talent alike.

    St Thomas Christmas Market

    December 2017

    Venue: Esplanade Park

    Several stalls selling Christmas treats and seasonal crafts line the street of Esplanade Park and Aleksanterinkatu. The Lucia Parade is another seasonal favourite; starting from Senate Square, the parade features elves, horses and historic cars.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Helsinki

    ListMap

    From simple B&Bs to palatial five-star hotels, there’s no shortage of places to stay in Helsinki – whatever your budget.

    Most are stylish, with quirky Marimekko prints popping up almost everywhere, and in true Finnish style, nearly all have saunas.

    Hotel Kämp

    Pohjoisesplanadi 29
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    A glamorous pile in central Helsinki, Hotel Kämp is well worth the price tag.

    Klaus K

    Bulevardi 2-4
    00120 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    A seriously stylish boutique hotel conveniently located in central Helsinki.

    GLO Hotel Kluuvi Helsinki

    Kluuvikatu 4
    00100 Helsinki
    Finland
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Chic neutrals and a private entrance to the Kämp Galleria shopping centre make this a good choice for design fans.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Tuesday, 27.06.2017 09:00 UTC

    cloudy

    temperature


    15°C


    wind speed

    15.625 mph

    humidity

    72%

    7 days forecast

    Wednesday

    28.06.2017

    18°C / 12°C

    Thursday

    29.06.2017

    18°C / 12°C

    Friday

    30.06.2017

    16°C / 14°C

    Saturday

    01.07.2017

    17°C / 13°C

    Sunday

    02.07.2017

    19°C / 15°C

    Monday

    03.07.2017

    18°C / 14°C

    Tuesday

    04.07.2017

    16°C / 13°C

    Climate and best time to visit Helsinki

    Finland is the land of the fabled midnight sun, and although Helsinki, at the southern end of the country, doesn’t suffer from either extreme dark or continual sunshine, it does get dark during the winter months. With just a few hours of light each day, this is the best time to come if you’re planning to hit the museums, but not great for any sort of outdoor plans. Summers, by contrast, benefit from lovely long evenings and mellow temperatures, making it the best time to visit.

    Climate & best time to visit Finland

    Finland has a reputation as a land of ice and snow, but summers are warm and sunny, with daytime temperatures reaching 25-30ºC (77-86˚F), and even spring and autumn can be surprisingly mild. The sun never truly sets in midsummer and locals take full advantage of the midnight sun for late-night sports, barbecues and parties. Finland only really deserves its frosty reputation in winter, from November to mid March, when temperatures plummet to -20ºC/-4ºF or lower. Winter days are short and in Lapland, the sun may not clear the horizon at all. In the far north, the snow cover can last from as early as October till as late as May. Rainfall is distributed fairly evenly throughout the rest of the year. During June and July, forested areas are plagued by gnats and mosquitoes, particularly in the north of the country. Bring plenty of insect repellent.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    8 °C

    -34 °C

    9 °C

    -31 °C

    12 °C

    -24 °C

    19 °C

    -16 °C

    27 °C

    -4 °C

    30 °C

    0 °C

    31 °C

    6 °C

    31 °C

    2 °C

    26 °C

    -4 °C

    17 °C

    -10 °C

    11 °C

    -18 °C

    9 °C

    -29 °C

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    41 mm

    32 mm

    35 mm

    37 mm

    31 mm

    41 mm

    60 mm

    74 mm

    73 mm

    71 mm

    67 mm

    59 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    1 h

    2 h

    4 h

    6 h

    8 h

    9 h

    8 h

    7 h

    4 h

    2 h

    1 h

    0 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    85 %

    84 %

    82 %

    75 %

    67 %

    68 %

    73 %

    78 %

    82 %

    83 %

    86 %

    86 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    2 °C

    1 °C

    1 °C

    2 °C

    5 °C

    11 °C

    15 °C

    16 °C

    13 °C

    9 °C

    6 °C

    3 °C

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ precipitationdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan8 °C-34 °C-3 °C-8 °C85 %41 mm91.3 h
    Feb9 °C-31 °C-3 °C-8 °C84 %32 mm72.6 h
    Mar12 °C-24 °C0 °C-5 °C82 %35 mm84.3 h
    Apr19 °C-16 °C6 °C0 °C75 %37 mm76.0 h
    May27 °C-4 °C13 °C6 °C67 %31 mm68.9 h
    Jun30 °C0 °C18 °C11 °C68 %41 mm79.9 h
    Jul31 °C6 °C20 °C13 °C73 %60 mm98.9 h
    Aug31 °C2 °C19 °C12 °C78 %74 mm117.2 h
    Sep26 °C-4 °C14 °C8 °C82 %73 mm114.5 h
    Oct17 °C-10 °C8 °C4 °C83 %71 mm102.9 h
    Nov11 °C-18 °C3 °C0 °C86 %67 mm121.2 h
    Dec9 °C-29 °C0 °C-5 °C86 %59 mm110.9 h
    year31 °C-34 °C8 °C2 °C79 %621 mm1084.9 h

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone/Mobile Telephone

    Dialing Code: +358

    Telephone

    Local and international calls can be made from street-side telephone booths and, in larger cities, telecentres. Most public telephones operate using a pre-paid card purchased from R-kiosks, shops and post offices. Shops also sell cards that can be used to make discounted international calls.

    Mobile Telephone

    Roaming agreements exist with most international mobile phone companies and GSM 900/1800 coverage is excellent – as you might expect from the home of Nokia. You may find it cheaper to buy a Finnish SIM card, available for about €15, which includes €10 of calling credit.

    Internet

    Free public access is widely available in tourist offices and libraries, and most large cities have commercial internet cafes. Most business hotels offer wireless Internet access and there are public hotspots in Helsinki and other large cities.

    Flight and accommodation

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Helsinki

    Stadtführer, Lufthansa, Travelguide, Shopping, Einkaufen

    Key Areas

    Most of the shopping action in Helsinki happens in and around Aleksanterinkatu (fondly known as Alexi to the locals), which is where you’ll find most of the international names as well as Finnish favourites such as Marimekko and Stockmann – the largest department store in Scandinavia. Elsewhere, the Kampii area is where most of the malls are to be found, while Uudenmaankatu is the hub for homeware design.

    Markets

    Most of Helsinki’s markets open only in summer but when they do, there’s plenty of choice. Top pick is the Hakaniemi Market Hall and open-air market which sells local food and handicrafts.

    Shopping Centres

    With 240 shops, Itäkeskus is the largest mall in Scandinavia, while the nearby Kämp Galleria is the place to go for upmarket local design.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    Shaking hands is customary as a greeting and guests are expected to refrain from drinking until the host or hostess toasts their health with kippis or skol (cheers). Most Finns prefer practical, casual clothing, except for special occasions. Many younger Finns rebel against this social norm through body piercing, dressing in ‘Gothic’ clothes and listening to heavy rock bands such as Lordi.

    Although renowned for their liberal attitudes, Finns can appear to be rather reserved with strangers, so do not be alarmed if conversations start slowly. Shoes should be removed when entering someone’s home.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 112

    Campers and trekkers should take precautions against tick bites and consider immunisation against tick-borne encephalitis if visiting the Åland Islands. Mosquitoes are a pest during the damp summers, particularly in the north – bring mosquito repellent and topical cream to stop bites becoming infected.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Dr. Lindberg, Otto
    EIRA HOSPITAL
    Laivurinkatu 29
    0150 Helsinki
    Finland
    Tel. +35-80-16201

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.

    Flight and accommodation

    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

    IATA Travel CentreIATA Travel Centre

    Flight and accommodation