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Best of …
… Bund and French Concession

Weather & best time to visit

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Saturday, 20.10.2018
06:00 UTC

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City map Shanghai

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    Good to know

    Shanghai: Port city reaching for the sky

    Ultra futuristic metropolis? Or a city steeped in colonial and local history? Shanghai is a heady blend of both. The ultimate expression of rapid change in China, this is a town that feels as if it’s in perpetual motion. Stroll along the majestic Bund and you’ll be wowed by the traditional buildings on one side of the Huangpu River and the ever-evolving cluster of towers on the other.

    Wander through the French Concession for a taste of the city as it once was, and be sure to dine on arguably the best food this massive country has to offer.

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    Top 10 sights in Shanghai

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    China, Volksrepublik China, Shanghai, Lufthansa, Travel Guide
    Buddhism with its mysterious-looking temples and monasteries is as much a part of Shanghai as the city’s superlative skyscrapers

    The Bund (Weitan)

    Zhongshan East 1st Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    The centre of the one-time ‘International Settlement’. Western traders first set up businesses in the city here and the area, on the banks of the Huangpu, is stunning. Fin de siècle banks and merchant houses provide a stunning contrast to nearby Pudong’s skyscrapers.

    French Concession

    Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Between 1849 and 1943, this approximately ten-square-kilometer area of western Huangpu was home to French incomers and other foreigners, most of them Russians. Trading in tea, porcelain and silk, they grew wealthy and built themselves magnificent villas, created parks and tree-lined avenues. The buildings of that period still remain, even if the building boom and lively business approach typical of Shanghai have clearly left their traces. During the day, there are a number of museums to visit, including the Shanghai Arts and Crafts Museum. In the evening, The French Concession is regarded as the city’s top district for a night out.

    Yuyuan Gardens

    218 Anren Street, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/63 26 08 30
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    varying

    Next to the Old City God Temple, these pretty traditional gardens date back to the late 16th century. Traditional pavilions, fish ponds and walkways make it utterly different from the modern city growing around it.

    Shanghai World Financial Centre

    100 Century Avenue, Pudong
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/38 67 20 08
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0800-2300

    This unique tower is one of the world’s tallest buildings. Its ‘bottle opener’ design makes it stand out boldly on the Pudong skyline. The observation deck is 474m (1,555ft) high, offering endless views of the city and its ever-growing sprawl.

    Shanghai Museum

    201 Renmin Avenue, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/637 23 50 01 32
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0900-1700

    One of China’s, let alone Shanghai’s, best museums, this huge space is dedicated to Ancient Chinese art. History buffs can lose themselves in rooms of beautiful calligraphy, carefully crafted furniture and dazzling jade and bronze.

    Jing’An Temple

    1686 Nanjing West Road, Jing'an
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/62 56 63 66
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0730-1700

    Nestled in the heart of urban Shanghai, the Jing’an Temple originated in 274AD and has been in its current location since the 13th century. Today, it features huge Buddhas, a majestic great hall and a new pagoda which was completed in 2010.

    Chenghuang Miao (Old City God Temple)

    249 Fangbang Middle Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0830-1630

    This old temple near Yuyuan Gardens is a Shanghai institution dedicated to a trio of city gods. As well as being an important holy site, it also houses dozens of small shops.

    Duolun Lu (Duolun Road Cultural Street)

    Duolun Road, Hongkou
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Think of this strip, once known as Darroch Road, as an extension of the Bund. Its early 20th-century buildings were built and run by the foreigners who controlled the Shanghai International Settlement.

    Rockbund Art Museum

    20 Huqiu Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/33 10 99 85
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Tues-Sun 1000-1800

    This Bund-based contemporary art gallery is one of the most cutting-edge places in Shanghai. It’s a great chance to see new, modern Chinese art without hopping on the bullet train to Beijing.

    Jade Buddha Temple

    170 Anyuan Road, Jing'an
    Shanghai
    China
    Tel: +86-21/62 66 36 68
    Show on map

    Opening times:
    Daily 0800-1630

    This venerable Buddhist institution is home to two jade Buddhas, brought all the way to Shanghai from Burma via a perilous sea route.

    Good to know

    Country information

    Country overview

    At the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China presented itself as an emerging country where old traditions coexist alongside astounding new technology and architecture. China has an immense wealth of cultural treasures. Forty-seven of the sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List are in China, and these include the Great Wall, the Forbidden City and the Terracotta Army of Xi’an. In addition to these, there are Natural World Heritage sites, including the Sichuan Giant Panda Sanctuaries and the protected area of the Three Parallel Rivers, which encompasses the upper reaches of the Yangtze (Jinsha), the Lancang (Mekong) and the Nujiang (Salween) in Yunnan.

    The capital city is Beijing, which is also where the central government is based. China is divided into 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities (Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and Chongqing) and two special administrative regions (Hong Kong and Macau).

    Geography

    In terms of area, China is the world’s fourth largest country, after the Russian Federation, Canada and the United States. With a population of around 1.38 billion, it is the most populous country in the world – China accounts for about 20 percent of the global population.

    China is bordered to the north by Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Russia; to the east by North Korea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (with Macau on the southeast coast); to the south by Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar, India, Bhutan and Nepal; and to the west by Pakistan, India, Afghanistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan.

    China has a varied terrain, which ranges from high plateaus in the west, at an altitude of over 8000 meters, to flatlands in the east. Mountains account for around one-third of the land. The most notable high mountain ranges are the Himalayas, the Pamir Mountains and the Kunlun Mountains. The Himalayas are home to ten of the fourteen mountains in the world that have an altitude of 8000 meters or higher. One of these is Mount Everest, which, at 8848 meters, is the world’s highest mountain.

    China’s most notable rivers are the Yangtze River, the Yellow River, the Xi Jiang and the Mekong.

    At the base of the Tian Shan Mountains is the Turpan Depression or Basin. This is the area of China with the lowest elevation. It is 154 m (508 ft.) below sea level at the lowest point.

    General knowledge

    Key facts

    Population: 1.38 billion (2018)

    Capital: Beijing

    Language

    The official language is Mandarin Chinese. A range of minority languages are also spoken, including Mongolian, Tibetan, Uighur, Turkic languages and Korean. English is sometimes spoken as a foreign language in business settings and by shop assistants, hotel staff and tour guides.

    Currency

    1 Renminbi Yuan (CNY; symbol ¥) = 10 jiao/mao or 100 fen. Notes are in denominations of ¥100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 1, 5 jiao and 1 jiao. Coins are in denominations of ¥1, 5 jiao and 1 jiao. Counterfeit ¥50 and ¥100 notes are commonplace. The Yuan is often referred to as the ‘guai’ in street slang.

    Electricity

    220 volts AC, 50Hz. Two-pin and three-pin sockets are generally in use. However, most 4- to 5-star hotels are also wired for 110-volt appliances.

    General business opening hours

    Mon-Fri 0900-1800, midday break of one hour.

    Public holidays

    Listed below are Public Holidays for the January 2018 – December 2019 period.

    Note:

    In addition to the Public Holidays listed, other holidays may be observed locally.

    2018

    Yuandan (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2018
    Chunjie (Spring Festival, Chinese New Year): 15 – 21 February 2018
    Qingming Festival: 5 April 2018
    Wuy (Labour Day): 1 May 2018
    Duanwu (Dragon Boat Festival): 18 June 2018
    Guoqing (National Day): 1 – 7 October 2018

    2019

    Yuandan (New Year’s Day): 1 January 2019
    Chunjie (Spring Festival, Chinese New Year): 4 – 10 February 2019
    Qingming Festival: 5 April 2019
    Wuy (Labour Day): 1 May 2019
    Duanwu (Dragon Boat Festival): 7 June 2019
    Guoqing (National Day): 1 – 7 October 2019

    All information subject to change.

    Enjoy

    Nightlife in Shanghai

    ListMap

    Shanghai’s nightlife ranges from low key, cosy bars to swanky cocktail lounges, with the odd, slightly louder music venue thrown in for good measure.

    If you want to party, options are plentiful and cater for all tastes.

    Senator Saloon

    98 Wuyuan Lu, Xuhui
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    A classy, American-owned speakeasy serving up excellent, affordable cocktails.

    MAO Livehouse

    308 Chongqing South Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Party lovers will be at home here, with Chinese and international DJs spinning the tunes.

    Richbaby

    101 Shanghai Square 138 Huaihai Zhong Lu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Popular with young Chinese looking for the latest hip hop and R’n’B.

    Cool Docks

    653 Waima Rd, Huangpu Qu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Over the past few years, a new entertainment district has sprung up at the southern end of the Bund. The restaurants, bars and galleries housed there in a 1930s building complex are always buzzing. People get together by the fountain or on Sunshine Beach, a small sandy beach with a restaurant and a fantastic view.

    Captain Bar

    Captain Hostel
    37 Fuzhou Lu
    Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Want a rooftop bar with a Bund view, but can’t face the price tag? Captain’s is where it’s at.

    Enjoy

    Restaurants in Shanghai

    ListMap

    Shanghai is inundated with excellent restaurants serving all kinds of Chinese cuisine.

    Thanks to its international heritage, though, it’s easy to dine out on different foods if you’ve had one too many dumplings.

    Ultraviolet

    Bund 18, 6/F, 18 Zhongshan Dong Yi Lu
    Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    10 seats and 20 courses, this science-led restaurant serves its meals with video projections. Original and brilliant.

    Mercato

    6F, Three on the Bund,
    No. 3, Zhong Shan Dong Yi Road
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Expensive

    Superb Italian food on the Bund from renowned chef Jean Georges Vongerichten.

    Southern Barbarian

    Ju'Roshine Life Arts Space,
    2/F, 169 Jinxian Lu56 / Maoming South Road
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    This highly rated place serves Yunnan homestyle cuisine. Barbecued pork and mint salad are a must.

    Vespertine

    505 Zhongshan Nan Road (Ecke Maojiayuan Road), Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Moderate

    Scallops, lobster and duck are all on the menu of this Californian-influenced spot.

    Shanghai Grandmother

    70 Fuzhou Road
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Price: Cheap

    A cheap city centre winner serving classic Shanghai dishes.

    Discover

    Calendar of events

    Chinese New Year

    16 February 2018

    Venue: Throughout Shanghai especially in temples and parks

    Chinese New Year is best recognised for having one of the grandest fireworks displays on earth, which almost everyone in Shanghai contributes to. The dates vary every year but it’s usually in February and lasts for 15 days. Apart from the fireworks, visitors won’t notice too much in the way of celebrations – it’s very much a family occasion. However, it’s worth visiting Yu Yuan Gardens on the final day, known as Lantern Festival.

    Shanghai Literary Festival

    15 – 28 March 2018
    Website

    Venue: Glamour Bar

    Writers from across China, Asia and the world attend what is China’s largest annual literary festival.

    Chinese Grand Prix

    6 – 8 April 2018
    Website

    Venue: Shanghai International Circuit

    The Chinese leg of the Formula One World Championship is held at the Shanghai International Circuit.

    Longhua Temple Fair

    18 April 2018

    Venue: Longhua Temple

    This fair, held in Shanghai during the third lunar month (late March, April or early May), is eastern China’s largest and oldest folk gathering, with all kinds of snacks, stalls, jugglers and stilt walkers.

    Shanghai International Film Festival

    16 – 25 June 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various venues in Shanghai

    With a screening programme of close to 1,000 films by filmmakers and directors from all over the world, this is one of the biggest events of its kind in China. The festival, first held in 1993, is a juried competition with prizes awarded in four main areas of competition.

    Shanghai International Arts Festival

    October – November 2018
    Website

    Venue: Various venues

    A month of live music, dance, theatre, magic and exhibitions culminating in the Shanghai Biennale.

    Shanghai Biennale

    November 2018 – March 2019
    Website

    Ort: Various venues

    The Shanghai Biennale is a series of talks, lectures, exhibitions and installations in various venues throughout Shanghai. Each biennale tackles a particular theme through a series of innovative and challenging displays and exhibitions.

    All information subject to change. Please check the dates on the relevant event organizer’s website.

    Enjoy

    Hotels in Shanghai

    ListMap

    Shanghai’s burgeoning reputation as a commercial and cultural powerhouse means its hotel scene is buzzing with new luxury and boutique properties.

    Business rooms are also readily available, although decent budget accommodation can be tricky to find.

    The Langham Xintiandi Shanghai

    99 Madang Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    Luxury accommodation in the hip Xintiandi district, with excellent rooms and great restaurants.

    Waldorf Astoria Shanghai

    2 Zhongshan Dong Yi Road, Huangpu
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Expensive

    A lavish hotel right on The Bund. Beautiful rooms with historical touches.

    Astor House

    15 Huangpu Road, Hongkou
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    An elegent hotel with a long-standing tradition and rooms full of charming nostalgia.

    Seine Taste

    Xangai 608, 4 F, Xikang Road, Jing'an
    Shanghai
    China

    Show on map

    Category: Moderate

    Eccentric rooms with a cool, kooky look, this central hotel is a steal for the style conscious.

    Jian Gong Jin Jiang Hotel

    691 Jianguo West Road
    Shanghai
    China
    Show on map

    Category: Cheap

    This business hotel offers superb budget rates, big rooms and a spa to boot.

    Discover

    Between Bund and French Concession

    ListMap

    Tower blocks and woks, luxury and lifestyle – nowhere is China as modern, international and fashionable as it is in Shanghai. Mega metropolis that it is, and home to nearly 23 million people, Shanghai still has an agreeably “small” feel to it. Almost everything – clubbing, shopping, dining – is done between the Bund and the French concession. The Bund with its restored colonial stately buildings along Huangpu River was once a colonial enclave, named a “concession,” which the British wrested from the Chinese after the Opium Wars of the mid-19th century.

    Soon after, the French arrived and settled a little further inland, in the French Concession, which still preserves an atmosphere of almost cozy village intimacy. Beneath its green plane trees, the old and the new China live together in a fascinating symbiosis.

    Chai Living

    370 N Suzhou Rd
    Shanghai 200040
    Tel. +86-21/56 08 60 51
    Show on map

    The creature comforts of a five-star hotel, but way more original – namely right next door to 2000 Chinese neighbors, who hang out their laundry to dry in the corridor, and in the early evening get together in the courtyard to dance or do tai-chi. These serviced apartments boasting every conceivable convenience are located in a spectacular apartment house in the Art Deco style of the 1930s. Each apartment has large panorama windows with a fantastic view of the skyline and is just a five-minute walk from the Bund. Double rooms with breakfast start at 130 euros.

    @Gallery Suites

    525 HengShan Rd
    Shanghai 200030
    Tel. +86-21/61 93 29 88
    Show on map

    The former residence of a Russian princess at the heart of the French Concession is a boutique hotel today, offering guests surprisingly spacious rooms, novel open bathrooms and a pleasing blend of Art Deco and Sixties design. In this central location, you have the main shopping miles and boulevards within easy walking distance but can also get a peaceful night’s sleep beside the hotel’s green courtyard. Double rooms with breakfast start at 70 euros.

    Jiashan Market

    37 Shaanxi Nan Road
    Lane 550
    200030 Shanghai
    Show on map

    Just how well Western city lifestyle with its design restaurants and rooftop vegetable gardens rubs along with typical Chinese market life can be witnessed in the week at this tranquil green city oasis in the French Concession. There are coffee shops here, bistros, small stores and good restaurants. On Saturdays, it’s home to a more Western-style organic market.

    Kathleen's Waitan

    200 Huangpu Rd
    Shanghai 200080
    Tel. +86-21/66 60 09 89
    Show on map

    Trendy restaurant and bar with a large riverside terrace and a magnificent view of the skyline. The pear-and-rosemary mojitos from the bar are absolutely first-rate, as is the Eurasian fusion cuisine to be had in this one-time opium warehouse.

    Vue Bar

    199 Huangpu Rd
    Shanghai 200080
    Tel. +86-21/63 93 12 34

    Show on map

    The  best panorama terrace in the city is at the top of the Park Hyatt on the Bund. In fact, there’s no better place from which to photograph the famous skyline on the other side of the river than this bar on level 33. And as day fades to evening, you can sit back, relax and enjoy the ever-changing spectacle of light against the skyscrapers from the hot tub or a daybed. Admission if you are not staying at the hotel is 12 euros (drink included), but it’s well worth the price.

    Streetfood

    Metrostation Tiantong Road
    Show on map

    The area around Tiantong Road metro station is certainly not one of the top spots in town, but for gastronomic explorers, it is definitely worth a visit. Together, Wuchang Road and Jiangxi Road form the city’s longest remaining authentic cookshop mile. High time, then, to set off on a cookshop safari and defend this gastronomic culture from looming extinction with chopsticks and spoons. The Malatang Hotpot on 178 Jiangxi Road, in particular, deserves a recommendation.

    Subconscious Day Spa

    183 Fumin Road
    200030 Shanghai
    Tel. +86-21/64 15 06 36
    Show on map

    This spa, a winner of the Architectural Digest eco design award, is one of the best in the French Concession, offering sublime relaxation beneath the hands of seasoned masseurs. The four-handed, head-to-two massage costs roughly 45 euros and lasts 60 minutes.

    Good to know

    Best time to visit

    Today: Saturday, 20.10.2018 06:00 UTC

    overcast

    temperature


    20°C


    wind direction

    north

    wind speed

    4.375 mph

    7 days forecast

    Sunday

    21.10.2018

    23°C / 20°C

    Monday

    22.10.2018

    19°C / 19°C

    Tuesday

    23.10.2018

    24°C / 20°C

    Wednesday

    24.10.2018

    24°C / 21°C

    Thursday

    25.10.2018

    24°C / 21°C

    Friday

    26.10.2018

    24°C / 22°C

    Saturday

    27.10.2018

    22°C / 18°C

    Climate & best time to visit China

    China’s extreme size means it has a great diversity of climates, but being located entirely in the northern hemisphere means its seasonal timings are broadly comparable to those in Europe and the US.

    The northeast experiences hot and dry summers and bitterly cold harsh winters, with temperatures known to reach as low as -20°C (-4°F). The north and central region has almost continual rainfall, temperate summers reaching 26°C (79°F) and cool winters when temperatures reach 0C (32°F). The southeast region has substantial rainfall, and can be humid, with semi-tropical summer. Temperatures have been known to reach over 40°C (104°F) although this is highly unusual, but during summer temperatures over 30°C (86°F) are the norm. Winters are mild, with lows of around 10°C (50°F) in January and February.

    Central, southern and western China are also susceptible to flooding, and the country is also periodically subject to seismic activity.

    Early autumn around September and October, when temperatures are pleasant and rainfall is low, is generally seen as an optimum time to visit. Spring is also popular, for similar reasons, and the many tourists visit in March or April.

    Be aware that if visiting during Chinese New Year a large number of businesses will be closed and public transport, in particular rail routes, can be enormously busy.

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    21 °C

    -10 °C

    26 °C

    -7 °C

    27 °C

    -5 °C

    33 °C

    0 °C

    35 °C

    6 °C

    36 °C

    12 °C

    38 °C

    16 °C

    38 °C

    18 °C

    37 °C

    10 °C

    34 °C

    1 °C

    28 °C

    -4 °C

    23 °C

    -8 °C

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    39 mm

    59 mm

    81 mm

    102 mm

    115 mm

    152 mm

    128 mm

    133 mm

    156 mm

    61 mm

    51 mm

    35 mm

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    4 h

    4 h

    4 h

    5 h

    5 h

    5 h

    7 h

    7 h

    5 h

    5 h

    5 h

    4 h

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    74 %

    76 %

    77 %

    78 %

    80 %

    83 %

    83 %

    82 %

    80 %

    76 %

    76 %

    75 %

    JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

    10 °C

    8 °C

    9 °C

    12 °C

    16 °C

    20 °C

    24 °C

    26 °C

    25 °C

    23 °C

    18 °C

    13 °C

    absolute maxabsolute minØ absolute minØ absolute minrelative humidityØ precipitationdays with deposit > 1mmsunshine duration
    Jan21 °C-10 °C7 °C0 °C74 %39 mm64.4 h
    Feb26 °C-7 °C8 °C1 °C76 %59 mm74.1 h
    Mar27 °C-5 °C12 °C5 °C77 %81 mm94.5 h
    Apr33 °C0 °C18 °C10 °C78 %102 mm105.1 h
    May35 °C6 °C23 °C15 °C80 %115 mm105.6 h
    Jun36 °C12 °C27 °C20 °C83 %152 mm105.4 h
    Jul38 °C16 °C31 °C24 °C83 %128 mm97.5 h
    Aug38 °C18 °C31 °C24 °C82 %133 mm87.8 h
    Sep37 °C10 °C27 °C20 °C80 %156 mm95.4 h
    Oct34 °C1 °C22 °C14 °C76 %61 mm65.2 h
    Nov28 °C-4 °C16 °C8 °C76 %51 mm55.0 h
    Dec23 °C-8 °C10 °C2 °C75 %35 mm54.8 h
    year38 °C-10 °C19 °C12 °C79 %1112 mm945.4 h
    Good to know

    Phone calls & Internet

    Telephone/Mobile Telephone

    Country code: +86

    Emergeny calls

    Police: 110

    Fire service: 119

    Tourist phone line (contact in emergencies, English is spoken): +86-10/65 13 08 28

    Telephone

    International direct dialing is possible at large hotels, but these calls are expensive. In large cities, there are card-operated public pay phones and phone booths that can be used to make cheap international calls. To make calls significantly cheaper, it is advisable to purchase an IC card for public phones or an IP card (prepaid) for use with all other telephones. The cards can be purchased at the airport and at a variety of convenience stores.

    Mobile Telephone

    GSM 900 signal for sending and receiving is available in Beijing, Guangzhou (Canton) and Shanghai, as well as in most of the other urban regions in the east and southeast, including Chengdu and Chongqing. If you want to make frequent use of your mobile phone while in China, you should buy a SIM card from a local network provider when you arrive in the country, or have one sent to you prior to your visit.

    Internet

    Internet cafés can be found in larger towns and cities, and Internet access via Wi-Fi is being offered by an increasing number of hotels and restaurants.

    Free Internet access via Wi-Fi is possible in many busy tourist spots, too. When using public Wi-Fi networks, it is a wise precaution to ensure encryption of all passwords, credit card details and banking credentials entered. Use of a VPN app or security software to check the safety of a hotspot is recommended.

    Enjoy

    Shopping in Shanghai

    Key Areas

    China’s obsession with shopping is embodied in Shanghai. Luxury and high-end shops abound in Xintiandi, a fashionable historical district. The French Concession has a wide array of excellent boutiques selling local designers. Fuxing West Road is also well worth checking out, if only for some window shopping.

    Markets

    Shanghai is full of amazing markets, especially if you’re after jewellery. Pearl’s Circles is renowned for offering affordable, design-your-own pieces. Dong Tai Road antique market is a great place to pick up off kilter souvenirs, while the Tianshen Tea Market is a must for tea lovers.

    Shopping Centres

    Malls are easy to come across in the city. The Shanghai IFC Mall specialises in luxury goods in a supremely fancy building. The Super Brand Mall serves up exactly what you’d expect, while the K11 Art Mall is a great place to pick up local artwork.

    Good to know

    Traveller etiquette

    Social Conventions

    It is recommended that vacationers conduct themselves with appropriately polite manners – although Chinese people tend to be broad-minded in the event that cultural differences cause misunderstandings. In business settings, it is worth finding out exactly what is appropriate (for example, in terms of attire and the type of car, hotel and restaurant chosen for business dinners). After all, these factors do play a significant role when evaluating the importance and credibility of a business partner. Generally, Chinese people are friendly but reserved. It is best to err on the side of politeness rather than of familiarity. Critical comments about China’s political leadership should avoided, as should comments concerning Taiwan.

    The full title of the country is ‘The People’s Republic of China’, and this should be used in all formal communications.

    People greet one another with a handshake. Foreign guests are sometimes welcomed with applause – it is customary to applaud in response.

    In China, the family name comes first. If you are invited out socially, it is polite to arrive a little early and bring a little gift with you, such as fruit, chocolates or a souvenir from your home country. Stamps are also a popular gift. If you are invited to the home of family or friends, money may be left for the children. It is customary to offer a reciprocal invitation.

    During mealtimes, diners raise their glasses to one another as each course is served. Formal, ceremonious meals have twelve courses. Offense is not taken if a guest only eats a little, but a polite guest will have a taste of every course that is served. You should leave a little on your plate and in your glass because otherwise, your plate or glass will immediately be refilled. If you are invited to a traditional Chinese celebration, it is advisable to find out what kind of gift is traditionally given to the host.

    If you are traveling without a Chinese-speaking guide, it is a good idea to always have the address of your hotel and any other destinations on hand, in Chinese characters. Alternatively, you could mark them clearly on a map. This is because there may not always be someone nearby who speaks English.

    Conservative casual wear is appropriate attire, and revealing clothing should be avoided. At some social occasions and some restaurants, formal clothing will be expected.

    Smoking is generally permitted, and no-smoking zones are marked.

    For most service professions, tipping is not commonplace in China. In areas with large amounts of tourism, taxi drivers and waiting staff are often given 10 percent; hotel room service staff are often tipped 2-3 ¥ and tour guides often receive around 1 US dollar per person. If you are traveling with a group, one member of the group should collect up all the money and present it to the tour guide in an envelope.

    Photography

    Photography is prohibited at airports and inside temples. It is also best to avoid taking photos of military installations or government buildings unless you have been granted official permission.

    You should not take photos of unknown people without their explicit consent. This applies to work environments (e.g., people who work outdoors) and to leisure settings (e.g., people playing sports).

    Good to know

    Health

    Main emergency number: 110

    Food & Drink

    All water used for drinking, brushing teeth or freezing should first be boiled or otherwise sterilised. Bottled water, widely and cheaply available, is the most advisable way of getting around this. Be especially careful when eating at small street-side stalls or restaurants where standards of hygiene may not be high. Pork, salad, scallops, snails and mayonnaise may carry increased risk. Vegetables should be cooked and fruit peeled.

    Other Risks

    Vaccinations against tuberculosis and Japanese encephalitis are sometimes advised. Bilharzia (schistosomiasis) is endemic in the central Yangtze river basin. Avoid swimming and paddling in fresh water. Hepatitis E is prevalent in northeastern and northwestern China and hepatitis B is highly endemic. Sporadic outbreaks of avian influenza (bird flu) have resulted in a small number of human deaths. Rabies is present. If bitten, medical advice should be sought immediately. There are occasional outbreaks of dengue fever. In 2010 China lifted its restrictions preventing HIV-infected visitors from travelling there.

    Contractual physician of Lufthansa

    Dr. Wang, Zhiwei
    WZW Medical Clinic
    1 Fuxing Zhong Lu
    Suite 509
    Shanghai
    200021
    PRC
    Tel. +86-21-6391-9295

    Please note that Lufthansa accepts no responsibility for the treatment nor will it bear the cost of any treatment.
    Good to know

    Visa & Immigration

    IATA Travel Centre

    The IATA Travel Centre delivers accurate passport, visa and health requirement information at a glance. It is a trusted, centralized source for the latest international travel requirements. The IATA Travel Centre is the most accurate source available because it is based on a comprehensive database used by virtually every airline, and information is gathered from official sources worldwide, such as immigration and police authorities.

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